LED COB Lights - June 2017

In 2017 a new type of LED lights - with the power regulator integrated onto the LED board hit the market. They were cheap and would automatically reduce the light output to limit the temperature to about 100C.

The problem is getting rid of the heat.

COB lighting info

Energy Use, Automotive Pollution and Whatnot

Energy usage was measured using the watts up? standard power meter from Electronic Educational Devices INC http://www.doubleed.com The accuracy is listed as a fraction of the measured value: +/-3% +/-2 digits for loads >10W and +/-5% +/-3 digits for loads <10W.

NOTE: This meter appears to be quite inaccurate for <10W loads such as switching power supplies. Ie I'll get a reading of 0W; but if I plug in another load that is about 4W and then add the one I'm trying to measure it registers 6W.

As of 2007 I started using a UPM EM100 Energy Meter and it seems to be much more accurate at lower power levels.

Power Meters

Belkin Insight

Bullfrog Power provides these to their customers and, as of August 2012, this is the most accurate power meter I have seen. It is the most precise (reading to 0.1W resolution) and works well in cases where the EM100 and Watts Up? fail to give reasonable results.

UPM EM100

This model is readily available in Canada, seems much more accurate (and consistant) than the Watts Up? at low power levels. However, very strange readings were obtained that made me doubt the accuracy of this meter. For instance the BergHOFF Induction cooktop registered 42W (outrageous and highly unlikely) when off, but the Belkin meter registered 1W (quite likely given the EU standby power draw requirements).

Watts Up?

I used one of the Watts Up? power meters when I first started power metering around 2000. It had issues measuring anything < 10W accurately.

Digital "SMART" flexnet isA2 iConA Hydro Meter

In Kitchener/Waterloo these meters seem to be configured to report the real nominal 240V current after displaying LST053 and the KWh used after displaying LST003. Multiply the current by 240V to get the power draw in watts.

Also there is a set of 8 bars below the numbers which function like the old rotating dial. The number of bars per hour is the Watts/hour. Or if you count to get bars/second and then multiple by 3600 that will give Watts. Counting seconds/bar is useful at very low power draws; but the digital readout (mentioned above) is much faster and more accurate.

Analog Hydro Meter

An excellent way to measure the power use of some things, and find vampires is to just use the hydro meter on your house. You need to time how long it takes to do a full, or partial, revolution of the dial.
P = (3600 * dial revolutions * Kh) / revolution_time_seconds
Kh will be indicated on the meter. For low power measurements I typically count how long it takes to do 0.1 or 0.2 of a revolution as that'll be 3 minutes! Note that the meter does become inaccurate at about 15W and less. For low power my meter doesn't seem to turn at all.

I've used the hydro meter to measure the power use of things like the furnace fan, oven and to verify the impact of my 3 biggest vampires (microwave oven, central vacume transformer, power bar for computer and it's extras).

Note - I've seen a brand name P4 computer draw <80W while all other P4's I've seen are >100W. That implies that the efficiency of the power supply is a lot better. From web sites (Wikipedia) efficiency is typically 75%, peaks at about 1/2 the power rating and can be as high as the low 90's.


Belkin Insight Power Meter

Here are some initial tests - comparing the Belkin Insight meter to the EM100.

Device Belkin EM100
Berhoff Induction cooker 0.9W 42W
Altera DE2 DC power blob 1,2,3 all off 0.8W, 1.4W, 2.0W 0W, 0W, 2W
Altera DE2 DC power blob 1,2,3 all on 5.5W, 10.5W, 15.4W 6W, 12W, 16W
Yamah P80 Keyboard (off / on) 1.3W / 5.9W 4W / 7W
Philips DCM278 stereo (off / on) 0.9W / 7.2W 0W / 9W
27" Color TV (1993) (off / on) 3.9W / 68.3W 5W / 62W
MagnaSonic DVD Player (off / on) 0W / ~7W 0W / 3W
Denonet GP-K780 Karoki (off / on) 0W / 10.3W 0W / 13W
VCR (off / on) 3.1W / 12.5W 3W / 13W
HP Deskjet 930C printer (mfg Nov 2000) 3.6W standby, 3.2W off 2W
HP Deskjet 720C printer (mfg Dec 1997) 2.2W off 2W
HP Deskjet 970Cse printer 2.6W off 0W

LED Tubes for T8 Ballasts

As of November 2015 the big box stores have started carrying LED based T8 tubes to replace fluorscent ones.
But this is a complex upgrade as the measurements below attest. The T8 ballasts are constant current power supplies and designed to work with 400V fluorescent tubes. Having the ballast work at a lower voltage (about 45V) and/or lower power is reducing the efficiency of the ballast. Not below and you'll see that going from one tube to two connected to the ballast gives you 2x the light but only a 50% increase in power draw.

Technically one should be able to put multiple Globe LED tubes in series for more light - using one ballast - up to the power limit of the ballast (typically 2 x 32W or 74W). Some ballasts I've used are rated for exactly 2 bulbs while others can take 1 or 2 or 3 and some will work with 17W tubes up to 32W tubes while others are only rated for 25W or 32W tubes. Power supplies (ballast) will drop in efficiency as the power output drops. Note that there are special ballasts made with different "ballast factor" - basically they put out more or less current in order to increase (HO or High Output) or decrease the amount of light emitted and power used.

I have heard of, but not seen for sale, T8 LED tubes that are designed to run off of 120Vac. These Globe tubes will be quickly destroyed if they are connected to 120Vac. There are also LED tubes which are designed to work with an external power supply (like a ballast) that is designed to power LEDs.

4' T8 dual-lamp fixture, Toec Tec ballast 2T8321120 labeled 0.49A max input, 17W to 32W tubes
1 T8F32 lamp 33.4W at start, 35.2W when warmed up
2 T8F32 lamps 54.0W at start, 57.5W when warmed up
1 Globe 18WT8 LED lamp 19.5W in either position
2 Globe 18WT8 LED lamps 31.6W
3' T8 dual-lamp fixture, unknown ballast
2 T8 lamps, F30, F25 40W, about 400Vac
1 T8 lamp, F25 26.1W, about 380Vac
1 T8 lamp, F30 26.5W
1 Globe 18WT8 LED lamp 22.8W at 43Vac

Intel i5 Power Test

For this test I tried 3 different power supplies and unplugged the video card to see the effect on power draw.

System setup common to all tests: Asus P8Z77-V LX motherboard, Intel i5-2320 3.0?GHz CPU, 2 of 4G DDR3 sticks, DVD, chassis fan (aprox 4W by itself with Antec EA380 power supply)

The video card used in 1/2 of the tests is Asus HD7770-DC-1GD5

Config Power Draw Belkin/EM100
Off BIOS Win XP Centos 6.3
Sparkle ATX-450PN, i3-2120 1.1W 59.7W W 51.5W
Sparkle ATX-450PN 78.1W 56.3W 54.8W
Sparkle ATX-450PN, HD7770 60.9W 47.5W
AOpen FSP600-SV 1.0W 49.4W 38.7W -W
Antec MT352 80Plus Bronze < 0.5W 42.1W 30.0W -W
Antec EarthWatts EA380 1.5W 53.2W 39.8W -W
Antec EarthWatts EA380, HD7770 68.1W 49.0W 56.3W
Seasonic 80Plus Bronze 0.6W 52.0W 38.4W 45.9W
Seasonic 80Plus Bronze, HD7770 66.1W 47.5W 54.8W

Video Card Power Draw

This first test uses an Asus M2N SE Plus motherboard with 2G RAM, Antec 80Plus EA380 power supply, LE1640 CPU and 80G SATA HD

Video Card Power Draw Belkin/EM100
BIOS Win XP
Motherboard video 68.9W / 69W 39.4W / 42W
Asus EAX300SE (ATI x300 SE) 79.0W / 79W 50.1W / 52W
Asus EAX1050TD (ATI x1050) 80.4W / 80W 50.8W / 51W
Video Card Power Draw
BIOS Win XP
Asus M3A78 MB, 3.4GHz x2 "270" CPU
GeForce GT 430 85W 58W
Asus Radeon HD 5450 "silent" 80W 56W
motherboard integrated video 70W 47W
Asus M2N SE Plus MB, 2.6GHz x1 LE1660 CPU
GeForce GT 430 83W 54W
Asus Radeon HD 5450 "silent" 81W 47W (52 w/o driver)
motherboard integrated video 64W 38W
Asus M2NPV-VM MB, 2.5GHz 4850e x2 CPU
Asus Radeon HD 5450 "silent" 86W 58W
motherboard integrated video 72W 49W

Fan Speed and Heat

P4 Fan Speed, July 2010

There are articles on changing the 3-wire P4 fans to run at various speeds. The trick is to run them not on the 12V, but to use 5V or 7V (diff between 5V and 12V). Note that if 7V is used - the ground reference is gone and the BIOS will not be able to measure the fan speed.

To control the speed for some of the measurements, a resistor was put in series with the 12V supply (1W 10%). Here is a comparison:
Voltage Speed Resistance Temp
CPU, chassis
2.8GHz Celeron D
12V (stock) 2650 rpm 49 / 36C
40/24C at startup
7V ?? rpm
5V 1850 rpm 59 / 38C
2.8GHz Celeron D Resistor Fan Speed Reduction
12V 1600 rpm 34 ohm 55 / 41C
12V 1760 rpm 25 ohm 54 / 42C
12V 1875 rpm 20 ohm 53 / 41C
2.4GHz P4 Resistor Fan Speed Reduction
12V 1900 rpm 20 ohm 38 / 37C

P3 Fan Speed

Many of my Pentium III computers are quite noisy and so I experimented with adding a resistor in series with the 12V line to slow down the fan. I tried resistors from 40 ohms up and was not happy with the noise reduction till I hit 160 ohms.

Resistance Fan Speed
rpm
Temperature
MB, CPU
200 ohm 2020 24, 37 (warming up)
27, 43.5 (warming up)
28, 44.5 (steady state)
0 ohm 4000 28, 40.5

AMD AM3 CPU Power Use - June 2012

Test computer is Asus M4A785T-M motherboard with 4G of DDR3, one SATA HD and Antec 80Plus Bronze power supply

AMD AM3 Power Use Comparison
CPU Power
In BIOS
Power
In Win XP
Quartus II 7.0 Compile Time
3.0GHz x2 "250" 70W 43W ? sec
3.1GHz x2 "550" Black 69W 48W 21 sec
3.1GHz x3 "445" 76W 45W 25 sec
3.3GHz x2 "560" Black 78W 49W 18 sec
3.8GHz x4 FD4300 64W - -

CPU Power Use - Sept 2008

I've seen a lot of confusing numbers from computer systems - Dell and IBM computers drawing around 60W compared to 100W for other P4 computers. I initially assumed that this was due to differences in power supply efficiency - but this wasn't testable (non-standard power supplies).

So when I did get some computers for which I could swap the power suplies (and had low power use) I verified that it wasn't 80Plus efficient power supplies which caused the lower power use, but that it was the CPU.

Sept 2008 Intel P4 Power Use Comparison
(AOpen Micro P4 case)
Computer In BIOS In Linux/Win XP Quartus II 7.0 Compile Time
Celeron D P4 2.4GHz (1G) 105W 83W 44 sec
P4 2.4GHz (1G) 84W 63W 50 sec
Celeron P4 1.5GHz (1G) 100W 64W 72 sec (1:12)
P3 1.2GHz (512M) W aprox 60W aprox 105 sec (1:45)

Computer Power Use - April 2014

I decided to evaluate the Celeron CPUs as a way to reduce power and cost of computer purchases. But first I had to test the effect on performance for Quartus compiles (1, 2, 4 or 8 simultaneous compiles). Performance for Windows is worse as it's all I/O bound on the Samba file server.

CPU CPU Cost In BIOS In Linux running MPrime ECE 327 FPGA Compile Time (seconds)
1x, 2x, 4x, 8x
Asus P8H77-M MB, Antec MT-352 80+ Bronze PS, 2 x 4G DDR3-1600
i7-3770 3.4GHz $347 47.5W 35.8W 101W 23, 22, 22, 30
i3-2120 ~$115 41.0W 29.3W 67.4W 27, 28, 39, 1:11
Celeron G1620 2.7GHz $55 31.7W 28.6W Linux 41.7W 32, 34, 58, 1:45
Asus H81M-C MB, Antec MT-352 80+ Bronze PS, 2 x 4G DDR3-1600
i3-4130 3.4GHz $142 41.5W 30.0W 80.3W 24, 25, 35, 1:00
Celeron G3420 3.2GHz $87 45.2W 30.8W 68.8W 25, 28, 42, 1:22

Computer Power Use - March 2016

This is a quick test with some 6th generation Intel CPUs. The power supply is Antec MT-350 80Plus, motherboard SuperMicro X11SSZ-TLN4F
CPU Off In BIOS In Linux running MPrime ECE 327 FPGA Compile Time (seconds)
1x, 2x, 4x, 8x
i3-6100 3.7GHz 8.6W 39.0W 26.0W ?W -
i5-6600 3.3GHz (3.9GHz max) 8.6W 42.6W 35.8W ?W -
i7-7600 3.4GHz (4.0GHz max) 8.6W 41.6W 25.8W ?W -


Computer Power Use Summary

Modern PCI-Ex video cards seem to draw 20W more than old PCI video cards (inefficient power supply).


CPU Power Use - Sept 2008

I've seen a lot of confusing numbers from computer systems - Dell and IBM computers drawing around 60W compared to 100W for other P4 computers. I initially assumed that this was due to differences in power supply efficiency - but this wasn't testable (non-standard power supplies).

So when I did get some computers for which I could swap the power suplies (and had low power use) I verified that it wasn't 80Plus efficient power supplies which caused the lower power use, but that it was the CPU.

Sept 2008 Intel P4 Power Use Comparison
(AOpen Micro P4 case)
Computer In BIOS In Linux/Win XP Quartus II 7.0 Compile Time
Celeron D P4 2.4GHz (1G) 105W 83W 44 sec
P4 2.4GHz (1G) 84W 63W 50 sec
Celeron P4 1.5GHz (1G) 100W 64W 72 sec (1:12)
P3 1.2GHz (512M) W aprox 60W aprox 105 sec (1:45)

Computer Power Use Summary

Modern PCI-Ex video cards seem to draw 20W more than old PCI video cards (inefficient power supply).

80Plus power supplies such as the Antec EarthWatts and, at least, 2007 vintage Antec TruPower Tri power supplies offer 20% to 25% reduction in power use when the computer is on. On computers which are on 24x7 this means a payback on upgrading is just over a year at $0.10/kWh.

Intel Core 2 Duo microprocessors are power hogs. AMD Athlon 64 and 64x2 microprocessors use signif. less power at the same level of performance. Typical AMD systems I have use 60W under normal use; while Intel Core processors are around 120W - assuming inefficient power supplies.

Proper choice of computer motherboards can make a signif. difference. I've measured fancy "Delux" motherboards with WIFI which draw 20W more than other motherboards and this is signif. if one is aiming for a sub 60W power draw (which is easily achieved).

 

March 2016 Antec 80Plus vs Seasonic 80Plus Bronze vs Seasonic G 650W 80Plus Gold
Asus M5A88-M MB, 32G 1333MHz DDR3, 3.1GHz AMD Athlon II x3 "445", 3 x 500G WD HD, Adaptec 6405e RAID, 128G SSD, 2 x 250G SSD, fan
Power Supply Powered Off Power In BIOS FreeNas OS
Antec 80Plus Earthwatts 380 1.8W 110.0W 95.0WW
Seasonic 80Plus Bronze SS500-ET 500W 1.0W 107W 90.2W
Seasonic 80Plus Gold G-Series 650W 1.1W 107W 92.5W
April 2010 Antec 80Plus vs 80Plus Bronze Earthwatts 380
Asus P4P800VM MB, 2G, 2.4GHz Celeron D, no hard drive
Power Supply Power In BIOS (% reduction) Standby
AOpen FSP-200 (200W) 107W 3W
Thermaltake TR2 500 (500W) 105W 3W
Antec 80Plus Earthwatts 380 81W (-24%) 4W
Antec 80Plus Bronze Earthwatts 380 76W (-30%) 4W

 

April 2010 P3 vs P4 Computer Comparison
Antec 80Plus 350W P/S, 1 PATA HD
Computer In BIOS In Win XP
P3 1.2GHz,768M Asus TUV4x 40W 44W
P3 1.3GHz,1G AOpen MX36LE-UN 37W 39W
P4 2.4GHz Celeron D,1G Asus P4P800-VM 84W 50W
P4 2.4GHz P4,1G Asus P4P800-VM 67W 39W
AOpen non-80Plus 350W P/S, 1 PATA HD
P4 2.4GHz Celeron D,1G Asus P4P800-VM 100W 71W
P4 2.4GHz P4,1G Asus P4P800-VM 82W 55W

 

April 2008 Computer Power Supply Comparison
ComputerPower SupplyOff (switch) Standby In BIOS In Linux/Win
P4 2.8GHz, 512M DDR, 30G PATA HD, 8 x 200G SATA, 3Ware Esclade 8000 RAID
Asus P4P-800VM MB, NVidia, Intel Nic, no floppy
Antec Antec EarthWatts 380W W 5.5W 171W 139W
AOpen FSP550-60 W 15W 212W 170W Centos 5 Linux
P4 2.4GHz, 512M DDR, 30G PATA HD
MB845AD MB, NVidia GeForce MX2 400, Intel Nic
(2W less with ATI Rage128 video)
Antec Antec EarthWatts 380W W 6W 69W 49W Win XP
DTK PTP-2518 250W W 8W 83W 59W
PowerMan FSP250 W 5.5W 87W 62W
AOpen FSP200-60SAV W 7W 90W 65W
AOpen FSP250-60 W 5.5W 92W 66W
P4 2.4GHz, 512M, 40G PATA HD,
MB845AD MB, NVidia, Intel Nic
Antec Antec EarthWatts 380W 0W 6W 71W 52W
PowerMan FSP250 0W 5W 97W (0.81A) 64W WinXP (122W max)
Core 2 Duo 2.4GHz E6600 Asus P5BPRE motherboard
4 of 500G Sata II HDs, DVD Burner, 3 case fans
Antec TruPower Trio 650W or
Antec EarthWatts 380W
4W 11W 131W, 1.16A 117W 1.02A
Core 2 Duo 2.4GHz E6600 Asus P5BPRE motherboard
500G Sata II HD, DVD Burner
Antec TruPower Trio 650W 4W 11W 90W 75W, 80W HD active, 113W peak (Nov 2010)
P3 1.3GHz Celron, 80G HDAntec EarthWatts 380W 0W 4W (4W MB NC) 36W 72W linux
AOpen FSP250 - 4W (4W MB NC) 52W 53W
AMD Athlon 64 Asus 3800 CPU M2NPV-VM 2.4GHz, 80G HDAntec EarthWatts 380W 0W 5W 65W 43W
AOpen FSP300 - 7W (4W MB not connected) 85W 56W
AMD Athlon 64 Asus M2NMX SE Plus 2.4GHz LE1620 CPU, 80G HDAntec EarthWatts 380W 0W 6W 66W 40W
AOpen FSP300 - 7W 82W 52W
Asus P5B Delux, Intel Core 2 Duo 6600 2.4GHz
Asus A260FM PCI-Ex video, 3 x 160G Sata HD, DVD burner
Antec EarthWatts 380W 4W 7W (65mA) 122W, 1.08A 103W, 0.88A
AOpen Z400 - 10W, 90mA 146W 1.24AW 128W, 1.09A
Antec EarthWatts with PCI video card - - 116W 1.00A 94W, 0.83A
Asus P5B Delux, Intel Core 2 Duo 6600 2.4GHz
ATI PCI video, 30G PATA HD
Antec TruPower Trio 9W 100W, 0.87A 78W (Centos 5.0)

Oct 2007 Computer Power Comparison (P3-1.2GHz AOpen M/B, 60G HD, floppy
Power SupplyOff (switch) Standby In BIOS
P3 era AOpen FSP-250 250W (2001 vintage) 0W 0A 4W 0.04A 66W 0.55A
Antec SmartPower SP-400 400W (2006 vintage) 3W 0.03A 11W 0.10A 63W 0.54A
P4 era "Silencer 275W" (2001 vintage) NA 6.5W 0.055A 63W 0.53A
AOpen FSP200 (200W micro) (2004 vintage) NA 6W 0.05A 61W 0.51A
AOpen FSP300-60SV (300W micro) (2007 vintage) NA 4W 0.045A 61W 0.52A
P2 era DTK PTP-2518 250W (2000 vintage) 0W 0A 6W 0.05A 58W 0.48A

ItemPower draw
Electronic Test Equipment
BK Precision 8500, 300W DC load0W off, 9W on (unloaded) (July 2012)
Genrad RLC Digibridge 16570W off, 17W on (May 2012)
Fluke 8000A LED DMM (3.5 digit)0W off, 3.5W to 3.8W on (Nov 2014)
Fluke 8010A LCD DMM (3.5 digit)0W off, <1W on (May 2012)
Keithley 168 DMM (3.5 digit)0W off, 4W on (May 2012)
Keithley 196 DMM0W off, 15W on (May 2012)
Hameg DMM HM 8011-3 (attaches to 'scope)0W off, 3.5W on (May 2012)
Boonton 7200 Capacitance Meter()0W off, 19W on (May 2012)
Tektronics 577 Curve Tracer0W off, 20W on (May 2012)
Tektronics 2235 100MHz Oscilloscope0W off, 35W on (May 2012)
Tektronics 2221A 100MHz Storage Oscilloscope0W off, 70W on (May 2012)
Philips PM 3240 7ns risetime Oscilloscope0W off, 22W on (May 2012)
Philips PM 3200 10MHz Oscilloscope (1970's vintage?)0W off, 18W on (May 2012)
Hameg HM605 Oscilloscope (1985 vintage)0W off, 35W on (Apr 2012)
HP 1725A 275MHz Oscilloscope 0W off, 76W on (Apr 2012)
Tektronix 2245A 100MHz Oscilloscope 0W off, 80W on (Apr 2012)
Tektronix 2221A 100MHz Digital Storage Oscilloscope <0.5W off, 69.0 to 72.0W depending upon screen brightness (July 2015)
GW GFG-8016G Function Generator0W off, 8W on (Apr 2012)
GW GFG-813 Function Generator0W off, 20W on (Apr 2012)
Interstate F30 Function Generator0W off, 14W on (Apr 2012)
Kenwood AG203 Function Generator0W off, 2W on (Apr 2012)
Agilent U1733C handheld LCR meter<0.5W off, < 0.5W on (Apr 2014)
Agilent B2902A SMU (precision source / measurement2.8W off, 92.2W on, peak 136W (Apr 2014)
Agilent 54622D Mixed Signal 100MHz 200MSamp/sec Oscilloscope0W off, 50W on (Apr 2012)
Agilent DSO-X 2002A 70MHz Oscilloscope7W off, 25/43W on (cycles slowly between 25 and 43W (Apr 2012)
Agilent DSO5012A 100MHz, 2GS/sec Oscilloscope<0.5W off, 50.0W on (Apr 2014)
Agilent 33120A 15MHz Arbitrary Generator0W off, 25W on (Apr 2012)
HP Optical Power Meter 8153A with 81532A module (aprox 1995 vintage)0W off, 10.2W on
HP Optical Power Meter 8152 with 81521B head (aprox 1990 vintage)0W off, 22.1W on
Agilent N9310A RF Signal Gen. 3GHz7W off, 61W on (Apr 2012)
Agilent E5062A ENA 3GHz Windows 2000 based10W off, 100W on (Apr 2012)
Tektronics DMM4020 5.5 digit DMM4W off, 4W on (Apr 2012)
Fluke 8808 5.5 digit DMM6.6W off, 6.8W on (Apr 2014)
Racul-Dana 4002 4.5 digit DMM<0.5W off, 3.0W on (Apr 2014)
Agilent 33220A 20Mhz Arb. Fun. Gen2.4W off, 17.4W on (Apr 2014)
Leader LFG 1300S Function Generator0W off, 11W on (Apr 2012)
Hitachi VC-6023 Digital Storage 'scope0W off, 39W on (Apr 2012)
Nash and Harrison 3501A digital multimeter (nixie tube, 1970's vintage?)0W off, 10W on (Apr 2012)
HP 3575A Gain Phase Meter 13MHz (1980's vintage?)0W off, 30W on (Apr 2012)
Perrier Serial EPROM programmer (1980's vintage?)0W off, 9 to 13W on (Apr 2012)
Motorola MC 68000 Educational Computer 19810W off, 101W on (Apr 2012)
Plessey Microsystems PME68k 68-1B Educational Computer 19820W off, 35W on (Apr 2012)
Logic AM1808 eXperimenter Kit, power supply 5V 19W 3.8A3.4W running Linux, < 0.5W off
16 of 5307 single board Coldfire computers on AT power supply49W
20 of 5307 single board Coldfire computers on AT power supply62W
Linear power supply (orange case) 16W with of 1 of 5307 Coldfire computer, 9W no load
Linear power supply (blue case) 16W with 2 Coldfire computers, 11W with of 1 of 5307 Coldfire computer, 7W no load
Switching power supply 11W with 2 Coldfire computers, 6W of 1 of 5307 Coldfire computer, < 1W no load
Weller WR 3M soldering station (hot air, soldering iron, solder sucker)0W off, ~30W standby (950F, 660F, off) as it cycles between 10 and 45W, 225W using hot air tool
Appliances
Elkay ezH2O Water Fountain3.45W standby, April 2017
Excalibur 9-tray Dehydrator38W fan only, 645W max, 410W over 13 hours at 57C ambient 20C
10.23kWh over 24 hours for 5 trays of apple leather
Frigidaire GFGI13P3KS induction element4W to 12W off (avg 10W?), 1150W full power (Feb 2010)
Iwatani 1500 induction element, made in Japan5.4W off, 24.4W fan on (EM100 meter: 9W to 14W off, 1450W full power) (Nov 2011)
Iwatani US-9000 induction element (less tall Iwatani 1500, made in Taiwan)5.4W off, 1404W full power (Dec 2013)
BergHOFF EarthCheff induction element0.9W off, (EM100 meter: 38-42W off!!, 1450W full power, two units tested) ( Nov 2011)
Salton hot plate 1209 1000W element0W off, 944W full power (May 2012)
Cook 4c brown rice, 8C liquid in TFal Optima 6L pressure cooker #3205 (1.88kg pot, 950g lid) with Iwatani induction cooker0.34kWh, 15:20 min full power to get to steam, 0.4kWh at 32:30 min. total time - EM100 meter, Dec 2015
Cook 1c brown rice, 2.5C water in TFal Optima 6L pressure cooker #3205 (1.88kg pot, 950g lid) with Iwatani induction cooker0.24kWh, 8 min full power to get to steam, 15 min at pressure for 25 min. total time - EM100 meter, Jan 2015
Fry 7 chapati made with 2c flour using Iwatani induction cooker0.26kWh, 25 min near full power with cast iron pan - EM100 meter, Feb 2015
Kenmore water distiller - distil 1 gallon3.2kWh in 6.5h (July 2011)
Boiling Kettle 7c, 1.75L from aprox 15C to boil11.7A 1350W 0.14kWh in 6 min 12 sec
Black N Decker ToastRoven bake potatoes 425F (heat oven, bake for 60 min)on for 25:00 over 1:10:00 using 0.51 kWh
GE small microwave oven - cook medium squash 33 minutes high power0.39 kWh
Bake bread 375F (heat oven, bake for 40 min)1.5kWh over 55 min (using hydro meter)
Bread Maker Proctor Silex3W and 30mA standby, 100W kneeding, baking time 4:07 0.37kWh, 483W max, 3.97A max, aprox 2lb loaf of bread (just kneed bread takes 0.07kWh over about 2 hour 50 min.)
Note that the elec use is equivalent to baking 4 loaves in a full oven.
U of Waterloo hot/cold water blower fan (capacitor split motor??)LOW 1.48A, MEDium 1.58A, HIGH 1.91A (3A induction)
Large Home Appliances
HRV VHR1404B Heat Recovery Ventilator72W (low), 100W (medium?), standby 6W
HRV (VanEE Venmar model 1001) Heat Recovery Ventilatorrated 147W 1.4A, low and high speed, runs 20 min per hour in winter
GSW Spacesaver 12Gal, 40L, 1500W SS12SEB water heater set at 49C, 1" fiberglas insul (Dec 2006) in a cabinet at 33.1C ambient 23.1Cstandby losses 1.67kWh in 2.70 days = 0.62 kWh/day or aprox $25/yr, 1.0kWh/day with occasional use
GSW Spacesaver 19Gal, 65L, 1500W SS19SEB water heater set at 49C, 1" foam + 1.5" fiberglass insul (Aug 2007) ambient 22Cstandby losses 1.9kWh in 3.71 days = 0.52 kWh/day or 22W average, +1.0kWh/day heating water for a family of 4
Hot water circulator (continously circulate hot water thru all pipes!)aprox 700W
Duomatic oil burner furnace214W on, 8W standby
Duomatic oil burner furnace dual squirrel cag fan 260W on
York Furnace (2006 York GY9 92% eff. gas) 0.11A 13W, 785W average when running fan in low speed for heating, 7.72A estimated 750W, 1.4kWpeak igniting (1150W -> 1450W fan speed changed from low to high) Fan Only 650W low speed and 805W med-low speed (measured with EM100 power meter)
Furnace high eff York GY9 cycle0.11A 13W standby, 5.6A 648W ignite, 2.5A 195W combustion fan on, 7.57A 740W running, 6.50A 661W after running for several minutes, 4.46A 479W fan blower only
Furnace high eff York GY9 5.36A 550W fan on med-low speed
Furnace (1990 Lennox G8 low eff. gas) 0.14A 17W, fan on 383W 4.55A, 432Wpeak (with power meter)
Furnace Fan (Lennox G8 low eff. gas)325W via house power meter (230 hours heating Sept 2005 -> June 2006 winter)
"Star" S11FS32DR6 water softener transformer6W, 55mA (AC xformer)
Culligan water softener3.3W (2016)
Basement dehumidifier (summer use)240W running, 121Wh in 9 hours, 400Wh in 33 hours
471wH IN 23.5H = 20Wavg July 2006 (hot but not exceedingly humid)
Fans
Broan ATRE070C exhaust fan29W, 0.8 sones, 0.23A draw, rated 0.3A & 70cfm
Suncourt DB204 4" duct fan26W, aprox 2.5 sones, rated 0.25A & 80cfm, 5" rated 225 cfm 0.35A
Nutone bath fan (1990 vintage)71W, rated 100cfm, 0.7A, 1/91hp, 4 sones
room Fan 12"24W, 26W, 34W for 3 speed settings
Clocks, Radios, Phones, Answering Machine, Calculators
Sony Digital Picture Frame DPF-D72N (wall wart failed, using replacement)0.6W wall wart not plugged into device, 1.5W standby, 7.0W slideshow, Mar 2017
Sharp EL-2607S Electronic Printing Calculator0.7W off, 2.7W on, 5.0W printing, May 2015
Siemens C65 GSM phone ~2004 vintage< 0.5W on charger when charged, ~3.6W when phone on and plugged into charger, April 2017
Samsung S275 flip-phone< 0.5W on charger when charged, April 2015
Grandstream Budge Tone-100 VoIP phone3.1W, April 2015
Panasonic answering machine6W (0.14 kWh/day)
Sony RX55100W stereo 20W on
Candle JCR-850 clock radio4W
Sony ICF-C218 clock radio1.1W, 1.5W max with radio full volume, rated 5W
Cosmo Clock Radio (1980's vintage)2.5W
Sylvania cube-shaped iMode Clock Radio model SIP2921.45W radio on, 0.7W radio off
RCA RC05-A Clock Radio (1990's vintage?)1.3W
ProSonic PCR279 Clock Radio (1980's vintage)3W
Prosonic PCR-210 Clock Radio (1984)1.6W, 1.8W radio on
Centrios 1219820 Clock Radio iPod Dock< 0.5W off, 18.3WW radio on (volume did not matter), rated 16W
Citizen JCR529 Clock Radio (1990's vintage)1.1W, 1.4W radio on
900 MHz Cordless Phone4W DC transformer or 3W, ??mA switching wall wart
ATT EL51203 Cordless Phone1.3W (2016)
Google Android NexusOne SmartPhone (Jan 2013)1.1W when charged (27.9W for 24 phones on power bars)
Panasonic KX-TS620CB phonePhone4W
VTec 5.8 5.8GHz fancy dual cordless phonebase station 2.2W no phone, 3.1W charged phone, second phone 0.8W no phone, 1.5W phone in cradle, Nov 2015
VTec 5.8i 5.8GHz basic cordless phone1.5W charged, 2.1W charging, (2W 20mA with EM100)
VTec 5.8GHz IA5847 Cordless Phone March 20132.4W (charging or not), AC transformer
1980's vintage dual regular C60 tape phone answering Machine7W, 60mA typical, 14W peak, 5W transformer not plugged into unit
1980's vintage microcassette phone answering Machine5W tape running, 3W standby
1980's vintage microcassette phone answering Machine2.75W, 27mA with electronic (switching PS) 9V wall wart standby
2005 GE Digital Message System all digial phone answering Machine3W running, 3W standby
Small Electronics
PowerHouse Lamp Module LM465< 0.5W standby
PowerHouse LampLinc 2000STW< 1.1W standby
PowerHouse Transceiver Module TM7511.2W standby
PowerHouse Radio Controller Transceiver RR5011.2W on or off
STC-1000 110V Electronic Thermostat0.8W Belkin, 2W EM100 meter
Intermatic Time-All TN111 mechanical timer2.6W
Canadian Tire mechanical timer1.25W
Model 49556/TE158WT plug-in Electric Timer (15A, 1875W resistive or 5A 600W Tungsten)< 0.5W (with EM100 meter 2W)
Sunbean 12" x 16" heating pad47W, 48W, 50W, 51W on 4 power settings
rated 50W
Phillishave 555 shaver (1990 vintage)3.0W
Phillishave PT710 PowerTouch shaver (2013 vintage)< 0.5W off, 1.9W on
Computer Accessories (Scanner, Printer)
MLI 699 Powered Speakers (AC wall wart rated at 9V 300mA)2.5W on (no or low volume), 1.6W off
KOSS HD50 Powered Speakers (transfermer AC wall wart rated at 9V 1A)3.0W off, 4.4W on (no or low volume)
KOSS HD50 Powered Speakers (9V 1A switching supply wall wart)0.7W off, 2.0W on (no or low volume)
ZDisc External Storage 200G drive (mfg Nov 2005)1.6W off, 14.1W power on (in use or not)
NetBotz 420 by APC mfg ~20092.4W on, < 0.5W with the power supply not plugged into the unit
HP S20 slide/negative/print scanner 3.5W standby
HP Scanjet 3670 slide/negative/print scanner 4.6W light off standby mode?, 10.3W with light on (failed unit?)
Raven PR-9102 dot matrix printer0W off, 13W on, ?W running (Apr 2012)
Roland DXY-1200 X-Y plotter7W off, 13W on (Apr 2012)
Samsung ML-2165 Laser Printer <0.5W off, 2.0W standby (Jan 2013)
HP Deskjet 842C Printer < 1W off or standby
HP Deskjet 930C Printer, mfg Nov 20003.2W off (EM100 meter: 2W off or standby)
HP Deskjet 970Cse Printer, mfg Dec 1999 2.6W off (EM100 meter: 0W off or standby)
Tektronix Phaser 340 wax printer13W power switch off, stayed at 900W to 920W saying it didn't have wax but with wax in all trays and the room smelling of wax (March 2011)
HP LaserJet P3015 dtn laser printer< 0.5W off, ~900W printing, 14.5W after printing (fan on), 11.5W quiescent, 6.5W in Powersave (April 2014)
HP LaserJet 1110 dtn laser printer5W "Powersave On"
HP LaserJet 4000 dtn laser printer680W peak, 450W printing, 25W (0.20A) "Ready", 22W "Powersave On", (July 2009)
HP LaserJet 2430 dtn laser printer15W Sleep Mode, (July 2009)
Lexmark E250d laser printeraprox 400W running, 14W (0.12A) standby, 0W off (March 2009)
Cannon MF3240 multi-function scanner-fax-laser printer8.4W standby, 3.6W Energy Saving Mode(May 2017)
Television and TV Amps
19" Panasonic Color TV 75W
14" Color TV (1988)45W
27" Color TV (1993)3.9W off, 68.3W blackish screen (EM 100 meter: 5W off, 62W dark screen, 96W bad reception, 122W full white screen)
Toshiba TV/DVD 19LV610C (2009)3.0W off
26.3W typical, Oct 2016
23" ViewSonic VT2300LED 1080p LED TV (2011)0.5W off
32.7W typical, 38.0W at backlight 100%, 26.1W at 0% backlight, Viewsonic claims <50W max <1W standby, July 2011
41" Vizio 1080P TV~1W standby (alternating 0W, 2W), 1.75A, 203W blue screen without audio - June 2011
TV antenna amp (1993)2W (20C or 43C)
Station Earth TV antenna7W
Stereo and Entertainment Equipment
Yamaha P80 Keyboard1.3W off, 5.9W on (EM 100 meter: 4W 40mA off, 7W on) Wall Wart PA-3B rated 12V 700mA 15VA (Jan 2010)
1980's vintage Teac V900 cassette deck24w on, 29W playing tape, 0W off
Realistic SCT-35 cassette deck, rated 9W, mfg 1990 or earlier4.5W playing tape, 3.5W on, 1.3W off
Sharp RT-1157 cassette deck, rated 15W, made in Japan10.5W fast forward, 9.0W playing tape, 7.5W on, 0W off
Philips DCM278 Stereo (July 2010)0.9W off, 7.2W radio, 7.6W USB (EM100 meter: 9W typical, "0W" in standby or "off")
Denonet GP-K780 dual tape Karoki machine (1990's vintage)0W off, 10.3W on (EM 100 meter: 0W off, 13W on, 17W max volume)
Venturer Boom Box (1990's vintage)3W cassette, 6W CD, 4W radio, NO OFF SWITCH
Panasonic SA-PM22 portable stereo (radio, CD, tape player)19W On playing CD
0W Off
Memorex MX-3155 radio, CD, tape player mfg. July 20011.4W off (tape position), 3.3W radio, 7.0W CD playing, aprox 4W tape player (broken)
Marantz SR225 stereo receiver<0.5W off, 8.7W radio - lights on but no audio - seems non-functional
JVC RC-BX30 radio, CD, tape player)1.5W on off/tape, 2.5W FM, 6.1W CD playing, 10W CD seeking
Sony CFD-S05 portable stereo (radio,CD )0.7W off, 2.2W on
GE 7-4816B clock radio1.7W on
Sony CMT-EH15 Micro Hi-Fi 2W standby
Home stereo (amp, receiver)22.5W On
27W CD player playing
0W Off
MagnaSonic top-loading DVD Player0W off, ~7W playing (EM 100 meter: 3W typical, 5W peak, 1W in standby, 0W off)
Prosan DVD PDVD1053D< 0.5W off
3.55W on, 5.3W playing, Oct 2016
Samsung DVD-P390 DVD Player0.5W off, ~7W playing
VCR3.1W off, 12.5W on but not playing (EM 100 meter: 3W Off, 13W On, 18W playing)
Hitachi VCR VT-8000A5.8W off, 20.1W on but not playing, 41.5W playing (1980's vintage?, rated at 35W)
Pulsar VCR 45-2048-011.5W off, 20.9W on but not playing, ??W playing (1990's vintage?)
Panasonic PV-4941-KVCR14W on
Modems and Network Equipment
Freedom 9 KVM-16P 16-port KVM switch1.8W idle - March 2017
Avocent DSR2035 32-port KVM switch12.5W idle - March 2017
Netgear Prosafe XS708e 10Gb 8-port switch36.0W idle - March 2016
3Com 3c16477 1Gb 8-port switch7.5W idle, 12.0W two ports in light use - July 2016
Flextronics X430066 SDR InfiniBand switch (8 ports 10Gb/s)22.7W idle no ports in use
Voltaire 4036 QDR InfiniBand switch (36 ports 40Gb/s)89W booting, 75.5W idle no ports in use
Cisco ATA SPA122, 5V 2A power supply2<0.5W off, 2.1W phone not in use (April 2015)
Smart RG ST505n VDSL/ADSL modem<0.5W off, 3.3W booting, 4.5?W running with WiFi enabled (Feb 2017)
Zhone VDSL/ADSL modem 6718-W1<0.5W off, 5.0W booting, 6.6W running with WiFi enabled (March 2015)
Kasda KW5262 VDSL/ADSL modem<0.5W off, 4.2W booting and running (Nov 2015)
2-Wire DSL modem 2701HG-G0W unplugged from modem, 5.0W booting, 7.4W running (7W with EM-100 meter Oct 2008)
Pace 5.1V 2A power supply, 2-Wire DSL modem 2701HG-G0W unplugged from modem, 4.7W booting, 6.6W running, Feb 2015)
Cisco 857 ADSL router 0.7W off, 7.7W to 8.6W - March 2014
TrendNet TEW-432BRP 4 port wireless router4.0W - Aug 2014 (just plugged in, not in use), 6W with EM100 power meter
TP-Link TL-SF1005D 5-port 100Mbit switch1.0W with three link lights, 5-2016
StarTech DS51072 5-port 100Mbit switch0.8W with no link lights, < 1.4W with three link lights, 5-2016
CentreCom 8 port 10Mbit hub5W (3W with DC transformer not plugged into hub)
TP-Link TL-SF1005D 5 port 10/100Mbps switch0.5W - Feb 2015
DLink DI-604 4 port broadband router8W - May 2011
DLink DE-809TP 9 port 10Mbit hub3.0W unused, 1.7W DC wall wart only (with EM100 5W, 4W with DC transformer only)
DLink 16 port 10Mbit hub1W
Ovislink Hub-8+ 8 port hub3.9W unused, 1.0W DC wall wart only, Feb 2015
24 port 10Mbit hub8W
CenterCom 3024SL, 10 Mbit, 25 port network hub11W (2 ports in use)
CenterCom (Allied Telesyn) 3726XL 100 Mbit input with 24 x 10Mbit out switchtwo units: 19.1W and 18.2W (20W EM100), no ports in use
SMC Tigerstack 100 5324TX, fast (100Mbit?) 24 port stackable hub110W (no ports in use)
FS708 8 port 10/100 network switch24W
SMC Tigerstack 5324TX 24 port network hub-switch99W
Baystack 350 (T-HD) network switch52W (no module slots)
HP Procurve 2626 switch (24 ports 10/100, 2 ports Gbit)34W booting, 37W GBit ports connected
HP Procurve 2848 switch (48 ports 10/100/1000)70W booting, 75W 4-GBit ports connected
HP Procurve 2650 switch44W booting, 41W no ports connected, 52W all ports in light use
Cisco Catalyst 2900XL switch, 24 + 2x4 ports88W booting, 86W no ports in use
Cisco Catalyst 3500XL switch, 8 EMPTY ports59W all ports empty
extreme summit 48, 48 ports, no MDAs129W booting, 127W no ports connected
Nortel/Bay 450 switch, cascade module, SX Gbit module57W booting, 64W no ports in use, 68W all ports in light use
Nortel/Bay 450 network switch49W with cascade module, 54W adding Gbit SX module
PC Computer Equipment
FanTec 4-bay hot-swap SATA II RAID Cage3.0W without hard drives
Laptop Computer Equipment
Intel NUC Skull Canyon i7-6770HQ (256G NVMe M.2 SSD, 16G DDR4 RAM)off and hibernate 0.9W, idle in Windows 10 21.9W, running peaked at 54W, April 2017
Intel NUC i7-7567U 3.9GHz (256G NVMe M.2 SSD, 16G DDR4 RAM)off and hibernate 1.0W, idle in Windows 10 9.0W screen on and 7.7W screen off, running peaked at ~44W, July 2017
Intel NUC i5-5250U 1.6GHz to 2.7GHz (256G NVMe M.2 SSD, 16G DDR4 RAM)off and hibernate 1.0W, idle in Windows 10 8.0W, running peaked at 9.7W, Aug 2017
Apple MacBook Pro mfg 20100.75W off, ~24W booting, 9.5W on and unused, 4-2017
Dell Lattitude E6410 ~20101.0W off, ~17W on
Acer TravelMate 4060 (100G HD, 1.6GHz Pentium M, 2G DDR2 RAM)26W to 31W Mint Linux, 40W fullscreen movie, BIOS 17.9W to 23.5W depending upon screen brightness, off and hibernate 0.6W, power blob < 0.5W not plugged into the laptop
Acer TravelMate C310 (100G HD, 2.0GHz Pentium M, 2G DDR2 RAM)aprox 29W Mint Linux, 35W installing updates, BIOS 26.9W, off and hibernate 1.8W, suspended 2.1W
HP Touchsmart TX2-1020ca (128G SSD, 2.2GHz AMD Turion, 4G DDR3 RAM)aprox 38W Mint Linux, BIOS 44.8W, off and hibernate 1.3W
HP G62 Notebook (750G HDD, AMD Phenom II N850 3-core, 4G DDR3 RAM)31.7W Mint Linux, BIOS 38.9W, off and hibernate 0.7W
HP 6910p (160G HD, 2.0GHz, 4G DDR2 RAM)66W booting and charging, aprox 27W idle in Mint Linux, off and hibernate 1.45W
HP Mini 110-1115CA (160G HD, N270 Atom 1.6GHz, 2G RAM)aprox 14.1W, suspended 0.85W, off 0.7W, 12W brightness minimum
HP Mini (15G SSD, N270 Atom 1.6GHz, 1G RAM)aprox 15.0W running 0.7W off, 11.0W little used, 7.6W screen off
Acer One Aspire ZG5 (8G SSD, N270 Atom 1.6GHz, 1G RAM)14.1W running Ubuntu 11, <0.5W off, 15.2W in BIOS, Jan 2017
Lenovo ThinkPad T400power supply not plugged into computer 1.2W, 30W install software NOT charging, 38W installing software and charging
Acer Aspire One, 10.1" screen, 1G, Intel Atom N270 1.6GHz CPU, 160G HD0.7W off, 12W Linux Mint 17, 16W booting, 0.8W hibernate
Acer Aspire, 4G DDR3 2.3GHz Intel P6200 CPU, 500G WD 7200rpm HD0.5W off, 15.1W Linux Mint 17 with SSD, 18.7W Linux Mint with 7200rpm WD HD, 31.3W in BIOS, 0.6W hibernate
Dell Latitude E6400, 3G 2.2GHz P8400 CPU1W off, 18.4W running Win 7
Dell Latitude E6410 laptop1W off or suspended, 10.5W screen off, ~16W running Win 10
Dell PA-1650-05D2 laptop charger (19.5V 3.34A)cycles between 0W and 2W standby, est 0.5W average draw
IBM (aprox 2003) R40 Thinkpad laptop P4-M-1.5GHz, 2G RAM, 60G HD3.7W no battery computer off, 36.7W BIOS, 21.6W in Win XP, 3.9W suspended (Oct 2015)
IBM (aprox 2005) T43 Thinkpad laptop 1.73GHz, 2G RAM, 160G HD41.4W BIOS, ~30W in Mint Linux 17.3, ~50W watching movie, 7.6W hibernating (Jan 2016)
IBM (aprox 2001) T23 "2647" Thinkpad laptop P3-M-1.2GHz, 1G RAM, 40G HD3.3W no battery computer off, 22.5W BIOS, 17.5W in Win XP, 3.3W suspended (Oct 2015)
IBM (aprox 2001) T23 "2647" Thinkpad laptop P3-M-1.2GHz, 256M, 40G HD3.1W no battery computer off, 32W computer booting, 23.3W BIOS, ~20W in Win XP
IBM aprox 1998 390X Thinkpad laptop charger2.25W 30mA standby, 3W plugged into charged computer (2.1W without a battery in the laptop), 28W computer booting, 19 to 22W computer being used, 10.6W screen off
Hp Mini Netbook (9" screen, 19V 1.6A adapter)2W "off", 13W running, 16W max
AST Bravo 4/25 Laptop, Win 95, 640k, no battery2W "off", 16W booting or running
Apple and Sun Microsystems Computer Equipment
Apple 400MHz G4 1G ram computer90W typical, 115W max, 2W off
Apple 450MHz G4 20G HD, 640M ram computer45W typical, 60W booting, 6W sleeping, 3W off
333MHz Sun Ultra 10 computer100W typical (1.5A), 130W max
Sun Sparc XTerm1 computer15W
Tatung (Sun) Ultrasparc computer148W, 2W standby
Sun Ultra 80 PGX32 computer308, 11W standby
Sun Ultra 80 computer260W
Sun SparcStation 10 computer, 50MHz CPU, 96M RAM, 1G HD80W typical
Sun SparcStation LX computer, 50MHz CPU, 48M RAM, 400M HD42W typical, 60W peak
Sun 250 (2 processor 400MHz) computer113W, est 175VA with 4 harddrives
Sun 250 (2 processor 400MHz), 1G, computeraprox 300VA, with 4 harddrives
Sun 450 (4 processor 400MHz), 4G, computeraprox 450VA, with 4 harddrives
Sun 4500 (4 processors, 400MHz) computer434W (3.65A), 545W (4.6A) diagnostics during booting
Sun 4500 (12 processors, 400MHz, 8G, running, external HD) computer1,100VA
Sun 4500 (400MHz, 8G, no HD, base power draw) computer65W standby, 670W 12 CPU
610W 10 CPU
550W 8 CPU (Nov 2010)
Sun StoreEdge Array (empty 22 slot)156W typical
Sun StoreEdge Array (empty 14 slot)149W typical
Sun StoreEdge Array, 14 x 36G 10krpm HDs210W booting, 412W peak, settles at 365W 3.33A when not in use (315W with 3 HDs pulled)
Solid Data e100 2G sold state harddrive (has backup battery, 36G HD)100W booting, 81W running (nicad being charged??)
36G IBM FCAL Drive for StoreEdge12W each
CRT Monitors
17" Samsung 171S color monitor33W, 2.5W power saving
21" Sun color monitor90W, 60W dark, 112W white, <1W power saving
17" Sun color monitor PN17J059.8W mostly dark, 2.0W power saving, 0W off
19" TTX "1995A" monitor78W typical, 50W black, 7W 60mA power saving, 6W when off!!
19" Viewsonic PF790 monitor100W typical, 107W white, 84W black, 1W power saving
19" Dell Trinitron Ultrascan P991 monitor96 to 120W, 6W in "low power mode", 5W when switched off
17" Sony Trinitron CPD-E400 1999 monitor90W typically, 7W in "low power mode", 3W when switched off
17" ADI Trinitron 937G 1997 monitor105W typically, 8W in "low power mode", 2W when switched off (high power draw due to Trinitron tube with 3 guns)
17" 7278c Acer 1998 monitor65W VGA
82W typical 1280x1024, 3W in "low power mode", 2W when switched off
23" Acer X223W Oct2008 monitor38W VGA, 2W in standby
17" TTX 7765E 1998 monitor50W VGA
72W typical 1280x1024, 65W (0.83A draw) BIOS, 4W in "low power mode", 0W when switched off
17" TTX 7792SC monitor72W typical 1280x1024 screen
17" Tatung monitor62W in BIOS
65W est. 1280x1024, 5W low power mode, 2W when "off"
14" Aamazing CM8484E II color monitor (1992 vintage)47W black, 54W VGA
To Be Sorted
Lortone 3A Rotary Tumbler for stones23.8W unloaded, 24.4W loaded, Dec 2014
Zehnder fan coil (rated 1/15 hp, 1.13FLA with 2 blowers)137.0W high, 87.0W medium, 70.8W low speed
Zehnder 11908002246A fan coil (2 motors rated 50W 1.13A and 25W 0.6A with 3 blowers)210.0W high, 163.0W medium, 110.0W low speed
Altera DE2 FPGA Development Board1.5W with electronic 9V wall wart when on and < 1W when off
Electronic DC wall warts (Kodak camera model, Altera model for DE2 board)< 1W when no load connected
Electronic DC wall warts (2001 vintage Altera model 9V, 600mA)< 1W WITH 6 on a power bar - no load connected
Transformer-rectifier DC wall wart 9V, 1A, 18W rating 6W when no load connected
Transformer-rectifier DC wall wart 6V, 0.5A, 7.5W rating 1.5W when no load connected
Doorbell transformer 0.02A (2W assumed)
Doorbell transformer5W
PowerTrax 2000 power bar with LED display10W when on!! Mar. 2010
Hip Street FM transmitter MP3 player (2009)aprox 1.5W, (9V 0.5A wall wart at 4W when off, 5.5W when plugged in)
generic round Food Dehydrator250W
PicStart Plus2W - may 2011
Astro Flight AC/DC Auto Charger NiCd (1980's vintage?)4.1W without battery, 5.5W trickle, 14.1W at 1A out (4A max)
RYOBI 18.0V P110 fast charger NiCd4.4W standby, 56.3W on fast charging
Craftsman 12.0 to 19.2V fast charger NiCd (2012 vintage for cordless drill)0.5W standby, 4.2W trickle charge, 42.7W fast charging
Worx Powerstation 18.0V NiCd charger2.6W no battery, 3.0W trickle charge battery, ~25W charging
Craftsman 16.8V fast charger NiCd (18.0V 2.2A rating)3.1W standby, 10W trickle charge (7W standby with EM100 meter)
Kodak K200 NiCd/NiMH charger (mfg. 2000)1.15W standby
Kodak K1000 NiCd/NiMH charger (mfg. 2000)1.1W standby
LEGO NXT ONTOP AC adapter A31185G 8Vac 700mA chargeraprox 4.6W standby (qty fifteen on one power bar 36.3W)
AOpen H340 case chassis fan+3W for chassis fan labeled DC 12V 0.12A (aprox 1.5W)
Vantec eSATA HD Dock NexStor1.5W off, 16.6W with a 2004 vintage 200G Maxtor in use (20W with EM100 meter)
StarTech USB to SATA HD Dock< 0.5W off, 1.5W on with no HD, 11.0W with a 2004 vintage 200G Maxtor in use, 13.6W with HD in use (April 2014)
StarTech USB 3.0 hub ST4300USBM1.5W no ports in use using 12V 3A power supply (Feb 2017)
IO Gear USB 2.0 hub and card reader GUH286< 0.5W no ports connected, 1.3W with input USB connected to computer (Feb 2017)
AMD Athlon XP "3200+", PATA HD, 512M ram, Asus A7V600-X MB136W BIOS
2.2 GHz AMD Athlon "3500" 64 dual-core, 160G SATA HD, 2G ram, AOpen FSP-300 (low eff) PS, M2PV-VM MB7W when off, 87W BIOS, 56W Win or Linux idle - Nov 2010
2.2 GHz AMD Athlon "3500" 64 dual-core, 160G SATA HD, 2G ram, Antec EarthWatts EA380 (high eff) PS, M2PV-VM MB6W when off, 64W BIOS, 45W Win or Linux idle - Nov 2010
2.8 GHz AMD Athlon 64 LE1660 single-core, 160G SATA HD, 4G ram, Antec MT-350 80Plus PS, M3A78-CM MB5W when off, 71W BIOS, 49W Linux idle - Aug 2009
2.5 GHz AMD Athlon 64x2 6850e dual-core, 160G SATA HD, 4G ram, Antec MT-350 80Plus PS, M3A78-CM MB5W when off, 66.5W BIOS, 51W Linux idle - Aug 2009
3.1 GHz AMD Phenom II "550" dual-core, 160G SATA HD, 4G ram, Antec MT-350 80Plus PS, M3A78-CM MB5W when off, 85W BIOS, 76W Linux idle, 117W fully loaded - Aug 2009
2.8 GHz (3.1 GHz if <= 3 cores in use) AMD Phenom II "1055T" 6-core, 160G PATA HD, 4G DDR3 ram, Antec MT-350 80Plus PS, M5A88-V evo MB4W when off, 106W in BIOS, 73W Linux idle
3.4 GHz "270" 2-core, 160G PATA HD, NetCel RAID card, 4G DDR3 ram, Antec MT-350 80Plus PS, M5A88-V evo MB82W in BIOS, 48W Win 7, 61W Win 7 booting
3.1 GHz AMD "250" 2-core, 160G PATA HD, 4G DDR3 ram, Antec MT-350 80Plus PS, M5A88-M MB73W in BIOS, typically 51W in Win 7, lowest is 40W user logged in
3.1 GHz AMD Athlon II ADX445 "445" 3-core, Adaptec 6805e RAID card, 500G Velociraptor & Samsung 840 EVO SSD , 32G DDR3 RAM, Antec MT-352 80Plus PS, Asus M5A88-M MB sub 0.5W power supply off, 1.7W computer off, 99.4W in BIOS, 67.5W CentOS 7 Linux
3.8 GHz AMD FX FD4300 4-core, Adaptec 6805e RAID card, 500G Velociraptor & Samsung 840 EVO SSD , 32G DDR3 RAM, Antec MT-352 80Plus PS, Asus M5A88-M MB sub 0.5W power supply off, 1.6W computer off, 87.3W in BIOS (clock boost disabled), 91.5W in BIOS (clock boost enabled), 51.7 to 64.2W CentOS 7 Linux
3.3 GHz AMD FX 6100 6-core, 2 of 500G WD HD & Samsung 840 EVO SSD , 32G 1333MHz DDR3 RAM, Antec MT-352 80Plus PS, Asus M5A88-M MB 1.1W computer off, 87.3W in BIOS, 63W FreeNAS idle
3.3 GHz AMD Phenom II x2 560 2-core, Adaptec 6805e RAID card + fan, 500G Velociraptor & Samsung 840 EVO SSD , 32G DDR3 RAM, Antec MT-352 80Plus PS, Asus M5A88-M MB sub 0.5W power supply off, 1.6W computer off, 114W in BIOS, 73.0W CentOS 7 Linux
3.4 GHz AMD x2 270 2-core, Adaptec 6805e RAID card + fan, 500G Velociraptor & Samsung 840 EVO SSD , 32G DDR3 RAM, Antec MT-352 80Plus PS, Asus M5A88-M MB sub 0.5W power supply off, 1.6W computer off, 89.2W in BIOS, 65.4W CentOS 7 Linux
3.3 GHz AMD "560" 2-core, 160G PATA HD, 8G DDR3 ram, Antec MT-352 80Plus Bronze PS, M5A88-M MB85.9W in BIOS, typically 59.0W in Win 7
3.2 GHz AMD 1090T 6-core, 160G PATA HD, 8G DDR3 ram, Antec MT-352 80Plus Bronze PS, M5A88-M MB133W in BIOS, typically 67.0W in Win 7, 74.0W in Linux
4.0 GHz AMD FX-8350 8-core, 32G ECC DDR3 ram, Seasonic 80Plus Gold PS, M5A88-M MB98.6W in BIOS, 83.7W in FreeNAS, 110W FreeNAS with 6 of 1TB Velociraptor 10k rpm drives
3.4 GHz "270" 2-core, 80G SATA HD, 4G DDR3 ram, Antec MT-350 80Plus PS, M5A78L-M LX MB68W in BIOS, typically 53W in Win PE (42W after settling down)
3.1 GHz "250" 2-core, 160G PATA HD, 8G DDR3 ram, Antec MT-350 80Plus PS, M5A88-V evo MB4W when off, 84W in BIOS
3.4 GHz AMD Phenom II X2 "270" 2-core, 500G SATA HD, DVD burner, 4G DDR3 ram, Antec MT-352 80Plus PS, M4A785T-M MB1.0W off, 1.8W suspend, 76.9W in BIOS, 50.2W Ubuntu 14.04 LTS at 800MHz
2.8 GHz (3.1 GHz if <= 3 cores in use) AMD Phenom II "1055T" 6-core, 160G SATA HD, 8G ECC DDR3 ram, Antec MT-350 80Plus PS, M4A785T-M MB4W when off, 104W in BIOS, 90W Linux idle, 146W all 6 cores in full use
3.2 GHz (3.6? GHz if <= 3 cores in use) AMD Phenom II "1090T" 6-core, 500G SATA HD, 16G ECC DDR3 ram, Antec MT-350 80Plus PS, M4A785T-M MB4W when off, 112W in BIOS, 89W Linux idle, 160W peak all 6 cores in full use
2.7 GHz AMD Phenom II X2 235E dual-core, 160G SATA HD, 2G ECC3 ram, Antec MT-350 80Plus PS, M4A785T-M MB4W when off, 60W in BIOS, 43W Win XP July 2010
3.1 GHz AMD Phenom II X2 "255" dual-core, 160G SATA HD, 4G ram, Antec MT-350 80Plus PS, M4A785T-M/CSM MB64W BIOS, 37W Win XP idle August 2010
3.1 GHz AMD Phenom II X2 550 2-core, 160G SATA HD, 2G ECC3 ram, Antec MT-350 80Plus PS, M4A785T-M MB4W when off, 78W in BIOS, 43W Win XP
3.0 GHz AMD Phenom II "940" quad-core, 160G SATA HD, 4G ram, Antec MT-350 80Plus PS, M2N-SE MX Plus MB6W when off, 61W Linux idle, 174W 1.5A all 4 cores in full use
3.0 GHz AMD Phenom II "940" quad-core, 160G SATA HD, 2G ram, Antec MT-350 80Plus PS, M3A78-CM MB4W when off, 89W Linux 800MHz, 146W Linux 4 core loaded, 91W BIOS
2.6 GHz AMD Athlon 64 "1640", 160G SATA HD, DVDBurner , 2G ram, Antec MT-350 80Plus PS, M2N-SE MX Plus MB6W when off, 74W BIOS, 46W Win XP
3.0 GHz 6400+ AMD Athlon 64x2 "6000", 160G SATA HD, DVDBurner , 2G ram, Antec MT-350 80Plus PS, M2N-SE MX Plus MB6W when off, 116W BIOS, 48W Win XP
3.2 GHz 6400+ AMD Athlon 64x2 "6400", 160G SATA HD, DVDBurner , 2G ram, Antec MT-350 80Plus PS, M2N-SE MX Plus MB6W when off, 1130W BIOS, 47W Win XP
3.2 GHz 6400+ AMD Athlon 64x2, 80G SATA IDE HD, DVD rom, 2G ram, AOpen 2350-08ATA PS, M2N32-SLI Delux MB, Asus EN8500GT fanless video card60mA 7W when off, 183W 1.55A in BIOS, (103W without Cool 'n' Quiet Win XP
Swap in 2.4GHz single core Athlon 64 126W in BIOS, 98W in Win XP -- 5W saving for slower single core CPU
Exchange old PCI ATI video card - BIOS 161W, Win XP 79W -- Video card is about 23W!!
2.2 GHz 3500+ AMD Athlon 64, 15G IDE HD, DVD rom92W cpu running, 67W booting, 113W max, 55W max power saving (70W without Cool 'n' Quiet installed), 9W standby, 5W 50mA when "off"
2.4 GHz AMD 3800+ Athlon 64, 512M ram, 80G SATA HD, 300W powersupply56W Win XP, 6W off, BIOS 84W (85W 1G ram, 85W remove temperature controlled 1.5W pancake fan)
2.4 GHz LE1620 AMD Athlon 64, 1G ram, 80G SATA HD, PLUS80 powersupply, micro case40W Win XP (49W no Cool'n'Quiet), 6W off, BIOS 66W
2.4 GHz LE1620 AMD Athlon 64, 1G ram, 80G SATA HD, regular powersupply, micro case52W Win XP, 7W off, BIOS 82W
2.2 GHz 3500+ AMD Athlon 64, 1G ram, 80G SATA HD, DVD rom, 300W powersupply, micro case68W logged in, 7W off, BIOS 84W
2.2 GHz 3500+ AMD Athlon 64, 1G ram, 80G SATA HD, DVD rom, 300W powersupply, micro caseCool 'n' Quiet Enabled 58W logged in, 7W off, BIOS 84W
2x2.3 GHz 4400+ AMD Athlon 64x2, 1G ram, 80G SATA HD, 300W powersupply, micro caseCool 'n' Quiet Enabled 63W logged in, 70W playing MP3, BIOS 88W (Dec 2007)
2.2 GHz 3500+ AMD Athlon 64, 1G ram, 80G SATA HD, 300W power supply, micro caseCool 'n' Quiet Enabled 67W logged in, 69W playing MP3, BIOS 94W (Dec 2007)
2.4 GHz LE processor AMD Athlon 64, 1G ram, 160G SATA 2 HD, 300W power supply, micro case, embedded eth and videoCool 'n' Quiet DISabled 7W off, 59W Win XP logged in, BIOS 79W (Apr 2008), 85W cloning 2 HDs in DOS
single AMD Opteron 242 1.6GHz, 2G RAM
2 of 120G SATA HDs, Tyan dual CPU MB
Antec True 430W (low efficiency)
1W off, 8W standby, 129W in BIOS, 105W Linux (Sept 2009)
Asus H170M-Plus MB, Intel Core i5-6500, 64G DDR4 RAM
500G SATA HD
Antec 350W 80Plus PS
1.4W standby, 33.4W in BIOS, 25.9W in CentOS 6 (Sept 2016)
Asus P8Z77-V LX MB, Intel Core i5-2320 3.0GHz, 8G DDR3 RAM
320G SATA HD
Sparkle ATX-450 PN PS
1.0W standby, 60.4W in BIOS, 47.3W in Win 7 (Oct 2012, Belkin meter)
Asus P8Z77-V LX MB, Intel Core i5-2320 3.0GHz, 8G DDR3 RAM
320G SATA HD
Antec 80Plus PS
1.5W standby, 53.2W in BIOS, 39.8W in Win 7 (Oct 2012, Belkin meter)
Asus P8Z77-V LX MB, Intel Core i5-2320 3.0GHz, 8G DDR3 RAM
320G SATA HD
Seasonic SS-500 ET 80Plus Bronze PS
0.6W standby, 52.0W in BIOS, 38.2W in Win 7 (Oct 2012, Belkin meter)
Asus H81M-C/CSM MB, Intel Core i3-4160 3.6GHz, 8G RAM
500G SATA HD
Antec 80Plus MT-350 PS
44.1W in BIOS, 28.5W Win 7, June 2015, Belkin meter)
X399 AORUS Gaming 7 MB, AMD Threadripper 1920X 3.5 GHz overclock to 4.0GHz, 32G DDR4 RAM
SSD HD
EVGA 600W 80Plus Bronze PS, MSI AMD Radeon HD7400 graphics card
3.8W off, 78.2W in BIOS (85.1W with Tehuti 10Gbe NIC), 73.3W CentOS 3.10 kernel with Tehuti 10Gbe NIC, 124W compiling, Oct 2017
Asus Prime X370-Pro MB, AMD Ryzen 1700X 3.4GHz overclock to 3.8GHz, 8G DDR4 RAM
SSD HD
Thermaltake TR2-500W PS, NVidia GT218 graphics card
1.7W off, 69.4W in BIOS (58.5W without video card), 54.2W CentOS 3.10 kernel, June 2017
Asus Prime X370-Pro MB, AMD Ryzen 1700X 3.4GHz overclock to 3.8GHz, 8G DDR4 RAM
SSD HD
Antec MT352 80Plus PS, NVidia GT218 graphics card
58.5W in BIOS (50.7W without video card), 47.0W CentOS 3.10 kernel, June 2017
Asus Prime X370-Pro MB, AMD Ryzen 1700 3.0GHz overclock to 3.7GHz, 8G DDR4 RAM
SSD HD
Thermaltake TR2-500W PS, NVidia GT218 graphics card
1.7W off, 69.4W in BIOS, 53.7W Windows 10 idle (51.2W virtualization disabled), 54.2W CentOS 3.10 kernel and 47.2W with BIOS power saving enabled and virtualization disabled, June 2017
Gigabyte Z70 AORUS Ultra Gaming MB, Intel i7-8700 3.2GHz overclock to 4.6GHz, 32G DDR4 RAM
HDD
Thermaltake TR2-500W PS
1.9W off, 54.6W in BIOS, 35.0W Windows 10 idle, 32.4W CentOS 3.10 kernel, Oct 2017
Asus H170M-Plus/CSM MB, Intel Core i7-6700 3.4GHz overclock to 4.0GHz, 64G DDR4 Crucial RAM, 6816 bogomips
SSD HD
Antec 80Plus MT-350 PS
1.4W off, 36.6W in BIOS, 25.1W Mint Linux at 800MHz, 48.5W installing Linux from USB key, Feb 2016, Belkin meter)
Asus H170M-Plus/CSM MB, Intel Core i7-7700K 4.2GHz overclock to 4.5GHz, 16G DDR4
SSD and HDD
Antec 80Plus Bronze MT-352 PS
0.6W off, 42.8W in BIOS, 25.6W Win 10, April 2017, Belkin meter)
Asus H170M-Plus/CSM MB, Intel Core i3-6100 3.7GHz, 16G DDR4
SSD and HDD
Antec 80Plus Bronze MT-352 PS
0.6W off, 33.7W in BIOS, 27.3W Win 10, April 2017, Belkin meter)
Asus P8H77-M MB, Intel Core i7-3770 3.4GHz, 8G RAM, 6800 bogomips
500G SATA HD, DVD-ROM
Antec 80Plus MT-350 PS
1.3W standby, 47.5W in BIOS, 35.8W Linux at 1.6GHz, 101W Prime95 running, Sept 2013, Belkin meter)
Asus P8H61-M LE R2.0 MB, Intel Core i3-2120 3.3GHz, 4G RAM
160G SATA HD
Antec 80Plus MT-350 PS
0.9W off, 43.9W in BIOS, 30.8W in Win 7, 39.1W in Win PE imaging the system, 55W Win 7 installing updates (Oct 2015, Belkin meter)
Asus P8H77-M MB, Intel Core i3-2120 3.3GHz, 8G RAM
320G SATA HD
Antec 80Plus MT-352 PS
1.1W standby, 42.7W in BIOS, 34.8W in Win 7, 71.0W running GIMPS prime95.exe (Feb 2013, Belkin meter)
Asus P8H77-M MB, Intel Celeron G1620 2.7GHz, 8G RAM
160G SATA HD
Antec 80Plus Bronze MT-352 PS
0.6W off, 31.7W in BIOS, 28.4W in Win 7 (April 2014, Belkin meter)
Asus P8H77-M MB, Intel i3-3240 3.4GHz, 16G RAM
500G SATA HD
Antec 80Plus Bronze MT-352 PS
0.7W off, 36.7W in BIOS, 32.1W in Win 7 (Mar 2017)
Asus P8H77-M MB, Intel i5-3330 3.0GHz, 16G RAM
500G SATA HD
Antec 80Plus Bronze MT-352 PS
0.7W off, 37.8W in BIOS, 31.5W in Win 7 (Mar 2017)
Asus P8H77-M MB, Intel i3-2120 3.2GHz, 8G RAM
160G SATA HD
Antec 80Plus Bronze MT-352 PS
0.6W off, 39.4W in BIOS, 27.4W in Win 7 (April 2014, Belkin meter)
Asus P8H77-M MB, Intel Core i3-2100 3.1GHz, 8G RAM
320G SATA HD
Antec 80Plus Bronze MT-352 PS
0.7W standby, 39.0W in BIOS, 26.7W in Win 7 (Aug 2012, Belkin meter)
Asus P8H77-M MB, Intel Core i3-2100 3.1GHz, 8G RAM
160G SATA HD
Antec 80Plus Bronze MT-352 PS
< 0.5W standby, 42.0W in BIOS, 30.0W in Win 7 (Feb 2013, Belkin meter)
Asus P8H77-M MB, Intel Core i3-2100 3.1GHz, 8G RAM
160G SATA HD
AOpen FSP600-SV PS
1.0W off, 49.4W in BIOS, 38.7W in Win 7 (Feb 2013, Belkin meter)
P5B Premium MB, Intel 2.4GHz Core 2 Duo 6600 4G RAM
160G SATA HD
Antec TruePower Trio 650W PS
7W standby, 94W in BIOS, 79W Linux (Nov 2011)
1.5 GHz P4, 40G PATA H-drive, 512M ram80W in BIOS, 95W in Win XP
1.8 GHz P4, 20G PATA H-drive, 512M ram, Asus P4IBAS motherboard, NVidia card, Intel NIC, PowerMan FSP250-60GTV power supply (non-standard connectors!)76W 0.63A in BIOS, 61W typical Win XP (60 to 90W), 13W standby
2.4 GHz P4, 30G PATA H-drive, 512M ram, MB845AD2 motherboard, NVidia card, ?? NIC, PowerMan FSP250-60GTV power supply (non-standard connectors!)96W in BIOS, 72W typical Win XP (70 to 105W), 5W standby
2.4 GHz P4, 30G PATA H-drive, 512M ram, MB845AD2 motherboard, NVidia card, ?? NIC, Antec 80Plus EarthWatts power supply72W in BIOS, 57W typical Win XP, 6W standby
2.33 GHz Quad Xeon, 12G RAM, 3Ware Raid controller, 4 of 7200 rpm SATA II HD5W standby, 130W in BIOS, 119W in Linux, 196VA estimated (Apr 2009)
2.3 GHz Quad Xeon, 4G RAM, Supermicro 6015-VM3, dual 15k rpm 72G SCSI SAS HD17W standby, 141W in BIOS or Win XP-64, 152W peak
2.4 GHz P4, no HD, 512M ram, P4C 800-E motherboard, ATI card, Antec Earthwatts 80Plus power supply71W in BIOS
3.0 GHz P4, no HD, 512M ram, P4C 800-E motherboard, ATI card, Antec Earthwatts 80Plus power supply110W in BIOS
3.2 GHz P4, 120G PATA HD, 1G ram, Asus motherboard, ATI card, low eff (Sparkle) power supply10W standby, 165W BIOS, 186W booting, 116W Win XP
3.06 GHz Dual Xeon, 4G RAM, Intel SE7501WW2 (Sunfire V65x), dual 10k rpm 72G SCSI HD, CDROMonly one P/S plugged in and metered
22W standby, 223W in BIOS, 136W idle in Centos 5 (seems 9W/HD), 161W with 2 CPU cores in use
2.8 GHz Xeon, 2G RAM, Supermicro 6014p8222W typical Unix, 268W peak, 166W idle, 3W standby?
500 MHz Pentium III, Dell XPST 50072W in BIOS, 50W (idle) in Linux, 3W standby
2.5 GHz Core 2 Duo E7200 Intel, Dell Optiplex 76073W in BIOS, 50W (idle) in Windows 7, 7W standby (Jun 2012)
2.4 GHz Xeon X3430, 2G RAM, Dell T110(2 hard drives) 83W in BIOS, 56W (idle) in Linux, 130W peak in Linux, 8W standby (Dec 2009)
(1 hard drive) 3.7W standby, 65.2W BIOS, 44.2W Linux (Nov 2012)
2.53 GHz P4, Dell Optiplex (super-micro size)42W typical Unix, 75W peak, 31W idle, 0W off
1.8 GHz P4, IBM NetVista, 40G PATA H-drive, 256M ram7W, 60mA in standby; 67W in BIOS, 83W cloning HD, 70W in Win XP when used, 46W in Win XP when not in use
3.2 GHz i5-3470 Lenovo IBM ThinkCenter, 500G and 2TB SATAHD, video card, 16G DDR3 RAM, DVDROM< 0.5W off, 1.3W suspend, 40.9W in Mint Linux, Jan 2015
3.0 GHz Dual core P4 IBM ThinkCenter, 80G PATA HD, 1.5G ram, DVDROM3W off, 122W booting, 64W in Win XP Pro
3.0 GHz P4 HT Sony PCV-C31L, 80G PATA HD, 200G SATA, 512M ram6W off, 142W BIOS, 100W in Win XP Pro
2.0 GHz Del Evo D510SFF P4, 40G PATA HD, 512M ram, CDROM50W in BIOS, 60W in Win 2000
2.4 GHz P4 micro case, 40G PATA H-drive100W in BIOS, 7W 60mA when off
2.533 GHz P4desktop case, 1G RAM, DVDRom, 60G PATA H-drive96W in BIOS, 8W 70mA when off, 66W at Win XP login
2.66 GHz P4, 1G RAM, 2x CD-DVDRom, 2x 150G SATA H-drive138W in BIOS, 4W 40mA when standby or off, 107W typical, 170W booting, 150W defrag
2.8 GHz P4 Celeron micro case, 80G PATA H-drive109W in BIOS, 7W 60mA when off
3.06 GHz P4 Celeron micro case, 40G PATA H-drive111W in BIOS, 7W 60mA when off
3.06 GHz P4 Celeron D micro case, 1G ram, 40G PATA Hdrive, CDROM130W in BIOS, 97W XinXP login, 88W stanby, 5W 60mA when off
3.06 GHz P4 Celeron D micro case, 1G ram, 40G PATA Hdrive123W 1.43A in BIOS, 87W 1.04A XinXP login, 7W 80mA when off
2.53 GHz P4 Dell Optiplex sx260, ? drive42W (31W idle HD, 75W peak), 7W when off
2.8 GHz P4 computer, 1G ram82W, 63W idle, 120W bootup, 7W when off
3.0 GHz HTT P4 computer, 1G ram131W, 85W idle, 150W bootup, 7W when off
3.0 GHz HT P4 computer, 1G ram, SATA HD, DVDROM85W, 77W idle, 120W bootup, 7W when off
2.8 GHz Dual Xenon Supermicro 6014p8 computer, 2G ram222W, 166W idle, 268W bootup, 7?W when off
2.4 GHz P4 Celeron computer, 40G IDE drive80W typical (45W at times), 7W 60mA when off
2.4 GHz P5 Intel Core Duo computer, 5 Sata drives, 3ware Raid controller (9W), DVD burner174W in BIOS, 153W in Linux, 13W 60mA when off, 3W when power switch is actually turned off
2.4 GHz P5 Intel Core Duo computer as above, 1 SATA, DVD burner120W in BIOS
1.3 GHz Celeron computer (ATX, 40G HD)55W (0.805A draw) (6W and 70mA when "off")
1.3 GHz Celeron computer (ATX, AOpen motherboard, 40G HD)53W in BIOS, 60W in Win 98SE, 36.5W in Win 98SE suspend mode, 3W per 40G ID HD, 7W and 70mA when "off"
1.2 GHz Celeron computer (ATX, Asus TUV motherboard, 40G HD)56W in BIOS, 6W and 70mA when "off"
1.2 GHz Celeron computer (ATX, Asus TUV motherboard, 40G HD, CDROM, 512M)63W in BIOS, 43W standby, 4W off
1GHz P3 Compaq (2001-05-15) computer (ATX P/S, 1 HDs, 1 CDROM)3W standbye, 48W typical, 72W booting
900 MHz P3 Celeron computer (P3 ATX P/S, 2 HDs)40W, 60W at bootup
700 MHz P3 Celeron ATX computer63W, 72W at bootup, 48W idle
600 MHz P3 ATX, 512M, 2 NICs, 1 HD, computer60W in BIOS, 48W in Linux
633MHz P3 Celeron ATX computer, 128 -> 384M ram, 2 PATA HDs, Asus CUV4-C motherboard7W off, 60W in BIOS, 61W in Win XP
500MHz P2 Celeron computer (ATX)47W
466MHz P2 Celeron computer (ATX)80mA 6.5W standby, 670mA 58W BIOS, 460mA 49W booting
366MHz P2 Celeron computer (AT), audio card, speaker, 128M, 2.1G HD48W BIOS, 35W Linux
333MHz AMD K6-2 computer (AT)54W
AMD K6-333MHz computer, 128M ram, AP58 motherboard (AT)57W in BIOS
133MHz Pentium computer (AT)33W
133MHz Pentium computer (AT, 32M RAM, 2G hard drive)0W off, 41.5W BIOS, 40.5W DOS
75MHz Pentium S computer (AT, 32M RAM, 2G hard drive, P5TXBPro MB)0W off, 36.8W BIOS, 36.2W DOS
133MHz Pentium S P5HX-B computer (AT), 2G HD, 40M ram45W
1.7 GHz Pentium M computer, 1G RAM, 80G HD, special camera capture board7W standby, 65W BIOS
486/66MHz computer (AT)31W
486DX/50?MHz computer (AT)25W
AMD 386/40MHz computer (AT)32W
Packard Bell PB-VX88 8088 computer (640k RAM?, 1986 vintage?, no HD)32.0W
National Instruments PCI-6024E PCI Data I/O card4.5W, in BIOS only - card not used
computer harddrive (IDE, 8G, 5400rpm)5W
XBox 360 (mfg 2010)0.85W off, 70.0W on, 78.5W to 80W gaming (2016)
18" Sony SDM-X82 LCD monitor1280x1024 25 to 51W depending upon brightness, 0W when off, 2W power saving (mfg Feb 2003)
17" Acer AL1706A 17" LCD monitor1280x1024 12.5 to 28.5W depending upon brightness, 0.5W off, 0.75W standby (mfg Feb 2007, tested April 2015)
17" Acer AL1714 17" LCD monitor1280x1024 30 to 46W depending upon brightness, 4W 40mA when off or power saving (DC power blob)
17" Acer AL1716 17" LCD monitor1280x1024 33W, 2W when off, 2.5W in power saving (integrated power source)
24" Benq GL2450 LED LCD monitor1080p, <0.5W when off or standby, 25.8W at 100% brightness, 18.0W at 50%, 10.7W at 0% brightness (March 2013)
17" Benq FP71G+ LCD monitor1024x768 21W, <1W when off or power saving (integrated power source)
19" Acer AL1951 19" LCD monitor1280x1024 46W, 2W when off, 2W in power saving (DC power blob)
24" Philips M1244EC 16x9 LCD monitorVGA 45W, 2W when off or power saving, Sept 2010
17" LG 22MP47HQ-P 21.5" LED LCD monitor9.3 to 21.1W on, <0.5W when off or standby (Jan 2015)
17" LG L1710B 17" LCD monitor26W on, 3W when off or power saving
17" LG L1715S 17" LCD monitor (mfg 04/2004)18 to 32W on depending upon brightness, 25W typical, 0.5 to 0.6W when off or power saving
17" LG L1750S 17" LCD monitor32W on, 2W when off or power saving
22" LG E2211 21.5" LED 1080p monitor17 to 26W on, 2W when off or power saving
22" LG 22M38D-B 22" LED 1080p monitor8.7 to 17.2W on, <0.5W when off or power saving, Nov 2017
24" BenQ GL2450HM 24" LED LCD monitor<0.5W when off or standby, 10.9W to 79.9W, 19.4W at 50% brightness
17" Samsung 710n LCD monitor25 to 30W on, 3W when off or standby
19" Samsung 191T plus LCD monitor32.9W on, 1.0W power saving, 0W switched off
23" Viewsonic VA2342-LED monitor25.2W on, < 0.5W when off or power saving
17" Viewsonic VE710b LCD monitor25 to 34W on, 2W when off or power saving
17" Viewsonic VX2450wm-LED LCD monitor13 to 26W on, 20W typical, 0W when off or power saving
19" LG L1910S LCD monitor32.4W, < 0.5W off or power saving
19" LG L1950S LCD monitor24.7W, 0.6W power saving
19" LG L1952TO LCD monitor1280x1024 32->38W, 2W when off or power saving
19" LG L1953T LCD monitorVGA 27W, 2W when off or power saving, Sept 2010
17" LG L1752TQ LCD monitor1280x1024 24->34W, 2W when off or power saving
20" LG W2042TQ LCD widescreen monitor1680x1050 45W, 2W when off or power saving
20" LG W2043T LCD widescreen monitor1600x900 39W, "0"W when off or power saving (ie <0.5W)
22" LG W2242TQ LCD widescreen monitor1680x1050 48W, 2.5W when off or power saving
22" Samsung 226BW LCD monitor43.3W max brightness, 0.8W when off or power saving, mfg Aug. 2007
24" 1920 x 1200 Samsung 2493HM SyncMaster LCD monitor77.5W max brightness, 22.3W min brightness, 0.6W when off or power saving, mfg Jan. 2008
24" ViewSonic VA2446M-LED 1080p Monitor (2011)<0.5W off
22.1W at backlight 100%, 16.4W at 50% backlight, 11.2W at 0% backlight, Oct 2013
22" ViewSonic VX2250wm-LED LCD widescreen monitor17.5W 100% brightness, 10.3W lowest), 13.8W at 50% brightness, < 0.5W when off or standby, Feb 2013
19" ViewSonic VA1931wa LED LCD widescreen monitor1366x768 22W 100% brightness, 10W lowest), 2W when off or power saving Aug 2011
19" ViewSonic VX1932WM-LED LCD widescreen monitor1400x800 19W (100% brightness, 15W 50%), 3W when off or power saving, audio system not used when power metering, Viewsonic claims 15W typical, <1W off, July 2011
21.5" LG E2240T LED LCD widescreen monitor1920x1080 31W (100% brightness, 18W 0%, 24W 50%), "0"W when off or power saving, June 2011
22" Asus VE228 LED LCD widescreen monitor1920x1080 25W 100% brightness, 14W 0%), "0"W when off or power saving - May 2011
17" NEC Multisync 1770VX LCD monitor1280x1024 28W (<1W "low power mode")
Pandigital Pan1202 digital picture frame15W On
0W Off
small Camco GSU0421B Microwave Oven mfg 1991 (18" x 8.5" x 12" deep)3.5W standby, 958W on
Sharp R-310J Microwave Oven1.9W standby
Citizen JM5524 Microwave Oven 19983W Off
Danby Diplomat DMW904W (rated 900W) Microwave Oven2.0W Off, 1335W on (May 2012)
Danby D402W (rated 500W) Microwave Oven2.2W Off, 916 on (Sept 2013)
Sanyo EM-V728 (rated 1340W) Microwave Oven (mfg 7-1994)2.2W Off, (Jan 2013)
LG LMS1571SW 1.5 cu-ft Microwave Oven (2012)3.3W Off, 23.5W door open, 1665W on (Nov 2012)
Sears 1985 1.2 cu-ft Microwave Oven6W, 50mA Off
1.4kW On
Keurig 2.0 coffee maker2.8W standby, Mar 2017
Bravetti 6-slice Toaster Oven TO158BLtoast bread, 0.10 kwH in 4:57 min. 1.3 kw power draw
4-slice B&D Toaster Oventoast bagel, 0.057 kwH in 2 min. 30 sec, 1.51 kw power draw
B&D Toaster Ovenbake ginger cake: 0.053 kwH heatup, 50 min total 0.335 kwH
B&D Toaster Ovenheat fish sticks 200C/400F: 24 min total 0.238 kwH
Toastertoast bread, 0.031 kwH in 1 min. 50 sec, 1.13 kw power draw
LPS-1-LED-C Emergency Light, uses 30 red LEDs, rated 1.3W (Feb 2017)1.35W
Light Dimmer - incandescent lamps2 x 40W (1 regular one extra life), 75W when on, 24W when very dim, aprox 1/2 brightness at 60W, light filaments barely turning red at 15W!
Summary - a CFL would give more light for less power even when dimming the light.
wall mount Light timer Leviton 5,10,15,30 minutes0.75W light off, 1.4W when the relay turns on, aprox 2005 vintage
Cole-Parmer Digital Electric Timer Model 8683-10 (1980's vintage?)4.65W counting down, 2.1W on, < 0.5W off
GE torchiere 250, 55W rated 10,000hour, 3900k fluorescent tube, takes 1min to warm up44.6W running, Nov2016
Philips RL-120-TPC (04/1999), GE F20WT12 2' tube28.9W, 2.3W bulb unplugged, Nov2014
Sylvania QTP Pro Series ballast, GE F20WT12 2' tube17.5W, 3.9W bulb unplugged, Nov2014
Sylvania QTP Pro Series ballast, Sylvania F18T8/CW/K24 2' tube13.6W, Nov2014
T8 3' lights (Sylvania ECO 25W F025/T41/ECO and GE "Kitchen and Bath" 30W F30T841.5W both, 26.8W for the GE, 26.6W for SylvaniaW, Nov2014
T12 fluorscent lights4 x F40 (40W) = 174W
T12 fluorscent lights, pull 1 tube2 x F40 (40W) + one unused ballast = 98W
T12 fluorscent lights, pull 2 tubestwo unused ballasts = 21W
T8 fluorscent ballast33.5W with GE EcoLux F32T8 SP35 32W, 24.2W with used GE Wattmiser F40T12CW-RS-WM 34W
T8 dual fluorscent lightno tubes: 5.9W
1 tube: 32.8W and 35.1W warmed up
2 tubes 54.4W to 57.4W warmed up
LED COB light AC110V-45160-F10613 120V, 70W94W below 100C, 55W at 105C
LED COB grow-light AC110V-6040-F2525 120V, 30W41.3W below 100C
LED COB grow-light AC110V-6040-F2525 120V, 20W28.4W below 100C
Sylvania spiral CFL 30W (T5) 27.7W
LiteLine ALFT4 4' fluorscent T4 fixture, T4-28W-4100 bulb 28W 4100K25.1W (two samples measured)
T8 dual fluorscent lightsboth 59W
pull 1 tube 32W
pull both 0W
T5 Sunblaster 36" fluorscent lamp and F39T5 HO bulb29.7Wrated 36" 39W 2625 lumens (24" is 24W 2230 lumen; 48" is 5025 lumen 54W) A HO bulb will not work at it's rated power unless the ballast can power it so this product was misleading advertising!
T8 4' fluorscent, 2 of F32T8 lamps57.2W
candelabra socket incandescent night light 7W
night light Globe 100,000 hoursrated 0.7W 6.7mA 120Vac
Luminescent night light apparently rated 0.08W
Sunbean Slow cooker / crock pot107W 0.86A low, 190W 1.51A high
Smoke detectorsaprox 5W each
CO detector CO800 (rated 7W)3.3 to 3.6W (EM100: 4W 40mA)
GFI outlet GECI 1992 model0W (<<1W)
Central Vacum transformer7W, 60mA (1990's vintage, unloaded, aprox 12Vac)
Small Central Vacum transformer2W (2010 vintage, small one on a circuit board)
Central Vacum module Alutron CM12central vac switch on/off 1.4W, relay on 3.2W
Door bell transformer4W (unloaded, similar to Central Vac. transformer 1990's vintage)
1980's vintage Stanley Garage Door opener3W, 30mA (standby)
1980's vintage Stanley Garage Door opener2.5W
2013 Genie Chainlift 800 Garage Door opener9.8W
Frigidaire refrigerator200W running, 4W standby
1970's 1980's? vintage full-sized fridge with coils in the back - Sears Coldspot, 6.8A, 720w heater(summer)10.4 kWh/yr in 48.3h - 215W average, 30W when off (resistive heaters); butter warmer turned off (10W extra) - re-measured 11.36kWh in 61.32h in December
1990's vintage "Bar" fridge298 kWh/yr based upon a 96 hour measurement
2005 vintage full sized fridge 412 kWh/yr
pre 1993 full sized UPRIGHT freezer158W running, 2.23kWh running 15:14:30 in 24 hours = 93W average
2004 Woods UPRIGHT 17cf freezerrated 420 kWh/yr, 151W running
Fridge conversion: using 2004 Woods UPRIGHT 17cf freezer346Wh/day Sept 2010
Fridge conversion: using 2013 Whirlpool UPRIGHT 17.7cf freezer474Wh/day, rated 635 kWh/yr as a freezer, Dec 2014
Fridge conversion: using 2001 Woods chest 12cf freezer305Wh/day, rated 351 kWh/yr as a freezer, Fall2012
1993 Danby D1705WR full-fridge (no freezer) [rated 36kWh/mo = 432 kWh/yr = 47W continous average] 28W [over 22 hours]( 805Wh in 22.4h = 35.9Wavg, 1.26kWh in 36.5h 34.5Wavg - May 2006, 21C) or 39.5 W [over 26.3 hours in the summer aprox 25C]
typically 115W while running
Summer 2006 26C average 72.2h 3.85kWh = 53.3W avg
Aug 2006, 21C avg, 72.7h 2.80kWh = 38.5Wavg
26:52:15 run time in 4 days (3.05kWh) 0.77kWh/day at about 4.5C in fridge, 18C room temp (Nov 2008)
0.61kWh/day fridge at 7C, 18C room temp - failing thermostat (Ranco K59 P4891 90-22-5P24)
197? freezer 21cu ft chest250W when running, est. aprox $100/yr in a cold cellar at aprox 10C
1995 freezer 7cu ft chest [rated 32kWh/mo (384 kWh/yr) = 42W continous average]46W [over 19 hours]
110W while running
2001 Woods freezer 12cu ft chest [rated 351kWh/yr = 40W continous average], -18C46W [650Wh in 13.8h, 667Wh in 14.4H, 1.2kWh in 22.7h, 2.27kWh in 46.5h, 4.2kWh in 94.3h, 134kWh in 290h]
95W while running
4.28kWh in 82.7h = 51.8W avg Aug 2,2006 in 25C room
1.15kWh/day over 6 days 48W average Sept 2010
5.92kWh over 5 days or 1.18 kWh/day Sept 30th 2015, 10.60 kWh over 9 days 1.5h or 1.17 kWh/day Oct 4th - possible insulation failure based upon water puddling
Fridge conversion: using 2001 Woods freezer 12 cu-ft chest300Wh/day, estimated at 1.1kWh/day / 2.5 = 440Wh/day, 20C ambient, 6C in fridge
Maytag Neptune MAH6500A front load washer 3.4cu-ft175Wh, 28.9 gal
Frigidaire FWT645RH washer 3.1cu-ft155Wh, 34.8gal
top load Maytag washer 2.7?cu-ft172Wh, 33.8gal
front load Kenmore (2002 model) washer8.1W with the timer running, 128Wh, 20L hot + 92L cold water (with extra rinse), 51min to wash clothes, washes 2x as much as top loading machine with 1/2 the detergent
top load Kenmore (aprox 1985 model) washer170Wh, 60L hot + 90L cold water, aprox 25min to wash clothes
Items not measured:
GFI outlets (measured 0W), furnace (estimated from current draw), drier (estimated from current draw), Oven clock
Temperature (C)
Vents LOW (1/2 power) HIGH
All Closed 40C 54C
All Open 38.5C 49C

Car - Gasoline Consumption - MaxiTrip 1.2 TP100

Using a MaxiTrip 1.2 TP 100 I measured the following gasoline consumption on a 2005 Toyota Echo (in Aug 2011):
cold idle: 1.8L/h, 20C ambient, 1250 rpm
warm idle: 0.5 to 0.6L/h, 26C ambient, 650 rpm, coolant 84C

I hoped to have a flat road on a windless day to measure the fuel consuption at 70km/h in 3rd, 4th and 5th gear to see the effect of the gear ratio. However, it was very difficult to hold a steady fuel consumption - so much so that I gave up. Holding a steady speed wasn't the issue - but the gas consuption bounced between 2.4 and 4 L/100km while holding an apparently steady speed. Perhaps by logging the data and doing some averageing it would be possible.

I would like to remove the power steering pump and see the effect upon fuel consumption as it's apparently signif. However, that first requires removing the serpentine belt and tensioning the belts appears difficult.

Toyota Echo Power Steering Delete - August 2014

Note that our Echo is running oversized tires from our previous car 185/70R14 (76.0" circumference, 24.2" diameter). The stock sizes are 175/65R14 (72.1" circumference, 23.0" diameter) and 185/60R15 (74.5" circumference, 23.7" diameter). Our car shipped with the 185/60R15 but was sold to us with 175/64R14 tires. Tire size calculations are from http://tire-size-conversion.com/tire-size-calculator/


I used a bulb and hose to suck out about 400ml of power steering fluid. Refilling is easy - no bleeding of the lines is necessary.

Comments online indicate a 7 to 10% or 2 to 3mpg increase for a BMW E30 and an increase in the idle fuel consumption of 0.07 gpm (from 0.19gpm to 0.12 gpm). Our car is about 0.55 L/h or 0.14 gph (US gallons per hour) with power steering and 0.5 L/hour without for a 10% reduction of fuel consumption at hot idle. Summer highway driving (trip to and around the east coast of Canada) shows a 5% reduction in fuel consumption.

Gasoline contains 33 kWh/US gallon. One hp is 745W and gasoline engines are typically 20% efficient. That calculates to be 2.2hp for 1L/hour consumption. Given the change in fuel consumption the power draw of the power steering is about 0.05 L/h or 0.11 hp (hot idle) and 0.28 L/h or 0.62 hp (highway average). Highway fuel consumption is around 5.5L/100km and so at 100 km/h that equates to 12.1 hp.

Data Power-De-Steering

2014: 6538km 340.6L  5.21 L/100km power steering pulled winter tires

 2013 172.7L 3341km 5.44  Stock, Majestic tires assumed 5% smaller by tire size calc.

 2012 239.7L  4721km  5.33L/100km  Stock, Majestic tires assumed 5% smaller by tire size calc.

 2011 145.3L  2828km  5.41L/100km  Stock, Majestic tires assumed 5% smaller by tire size calc.
2005 Toyota Echo
Car Setup Cold Idle Hot Idle Highway milage Comments
Stock - power steering running 1.8L/h, 1250 rpm 5.54 L/100km Aug 2011, 20C ambient
Stock - power steering running 0.5 to 0.6L/h, 650 rpm, 84C coolant Aug 2011, 26C ambient
Power steering disabled 0.5L/h, 650rpm, 84C coolant 5.26 L/100km over 7 tanks Aug 7-22, 2014; 25C ambient
Power steering disabled 1.7L/h, 1440rpm, 30C coolant
1.3L/h, 1320rpm, 48C coolant
Aug 8, 2014; 14C ambient

Effects of De-Power Steering

I've cut the power steering belt and found the steering to be "different". Low speed steering requires more force; but I can parallel park and back into the driveway easily enough. The big change is the centering force on the steering wheel when maintaining a constant turn - but you get used to that. Three point turns are the hardest.

After removing power steering fluid the effect was: ??

Links For Deleting Power Steering

(Un)Powered Steering

Various people have mentioned that removing the power steering pump reduces fuel consumption at idle and for in-town driving. When a car is equiped with power steering the gear ratio is modified so that, with power steering, the wheels would turn more. This means that removing the power steering (by removing the belt) will result in steering that takes much more effort at low speeds. This is easy to verify - when driving on in a safe place, turn off the engine and see how much force it takes to steer. In particular note the steering effort at 5km/h or 3mph.

There are options to remove the power steering.

Oversized Tires

With our 1997 Escort I went with oversized tires to lower the engine RPM - as well as get cheaper tires. So instead of 185/65R14 I bought 185/70R14. 7 years later when the Escort had a failing transmission, was 12 years old, and not worth fixing the tires moved to our 2005 Toyota Echo.

Here is a comparison of tires for the Echo. Note that 175/65R14 is stock, 185/60R15 is an option (which our car came with - but the seller swapped out the 15" rims, put in 14" ones with stock no-season tires.

Note that sizes below are from http://www.1010tires.com/tiresizecalculator.asp
I assume that the calculated sizes are for summer tires.

Parameter Stock
175/65R14
"Majestic Brand"
Stock
185/60R15
175/70R14185/70R14 185/70R14
Motomaster snows
185/65R14
worn down summer
Cost $84 $100 $80 $82 - -
Diameter 23.0 23.75 23.6 24.2 24.5 23.3
Speed 100km/h 97 97 95 -
Dia %diff - 3.3% 2.9% 5.1% -
Weight
with steel rim
28lb 35lb -

Speedometer Calibration Measurements

In an attempt to calibrate the speedo in the '05 Echo we ran tests using a GPS:
P185/70R14 tires, at 100km/h, the GPS indicates ~98.5 km/h or 1.5% lower speed than the speedo!
P175/65R14 tires, at 100km/h, the GPS indicates ~92 km/h for

Car Milage

2009 Nissan Versa 1.6L? 1.8L? automatic transmission, driven 335km in Vancouver May 2010. 29.324L of gas used in mostly highway driving. That gives 8.8L/100km when the car is rated at about 8 city and 6 highway. This car had a nice low idle and generally worked well, but the milage sucks!

Here is the milage of our 3 cars. The Chevy Sprint we had for 12 years. The Ford Escort Wagoon, aka "Black Beast from Hell", we had from it's 5th to it's 12th year (transmission failure) and data from the 2005 Toyota Echo is lacking as we've only hhad the car since xmas 2009. Note that the tires on the Escort were about 3% oversized and that's been factored in to improve the milage 3%.

Here is a graph of the milage of various cars we've had in L per 100km and mpg (Imperal gallons)

Our Ford Escort had an automatic transmission. A friend with a 1999 Escort Wagon with a 5-speed reports the following milage:
I am currently getting 32 mpg with our Escort in the winter.
When we lived in the country, we were getting 41 mpg average annually.
Monthly averages ranged from 37mpg in winter to 44mpg in summer. Usually on a trip in the summer we would get close to 50mpg.
Monthly averages are ranging from 31mpg in winter to 42mpg in summer.

Emissions Testing

Efficient Lighting

I strongly recommend flourscent lighting for areas where the lights are being used more than 1 hour / day. The Philips Marathond flourscent lamps in particular give a soft white light that is flicker free. The bulbs are expensive but will reward you with a reduced electricity bill.
The compact flourscent lamps don't use the old style of transformer to generate the high voltage but instead use an electronic circuit and much higher frequency. For that reason they can't flicker and are much more efficient than the old style flourscent lamps. You get what you pay for in the sense that lower cost compact flourscents have a shorter life and are less efficient.

Light SourcePowerBrightness
Lumens
Lumens/WattCostLifetime
(hours)
Comments
T8 4' fluorscent tube32W295092$420,000 hour lifeinstant start 5000K temperature is too blue/harsh
GE Standard CF (Compact Flourscent)15W70047$10.506,000 hour lifefairly long - doesn't fit all lamps
Soft white40W46012?1,500
Long life40W42011?3,000
Soft white60W84014?1,000
Halogen60W90015?3,000www.lighting.philips.com/nam
Noma CF10W52052$38,000very short, time delayed start, 2700k (rated for -15C or warmer)
Noma CF13W80061$2ea (6-pack)8,000very short, very narrow base
Ikea CF11W??$5life?short, time delayed start, harsh color
Sylvania CF30W20006710.006,000 hour lifefat and long
Sylvania CF13W800628,000 hour lifevery short and thin
Sylvania CF9W4505013.00 for 2-pack8,000 hour lifesmall socket, starts at reduced brightness
Sylvania CF4W160408.006,000 hour lifesmall socket, starts at reduced brightness
IKEA CF5W170347.5010,000 hour lifesmall socket, starts at reduced brightness
IKEA CF7W300427.0010,000 hour lifesmall socket, starts at reduced brightness
Home Hardware CF25W150060??10,000 hour lifeshort, but fat - fits many lamps
Commercial Elec. (Home Depot)CF23W160070??10,000 hour lifeshort, but fat - fits many lamps, instant start
Home Hardware CF15W90060$56,000 hour lifevery short - fits all lamps (rated as 70W equivalent)
Philips Marathon CF15W90060$22 aprox10,000 hour lifevery short - fits all lamps
Philips Marathon CF20W120060$25 aprox10,000 hour lifeshort - fits many lamps
Pricemark [Sylvania?] spiral CF15W (12W actual draw)??$8 aprox10,000 hour lifeshort but fat,Starts quickly
Pricemark [Sylvania?] spiral CF20W (14W actual draw), 23W??$8 aprox10,000 hour lifeshort but fat,Starts quickly
 
incandescent filtered with a red mask
ie emergency or car tail light
1404603?  
High Efficiency LEDNANA80 (1998 vintage)?very long 
High Efficiency OLEDNANA50 (2000 vintage, achieved in production Dec 2005)?very longOrganic LED

CFL Bulb Type

Comment

Phillips MarathonThese bulbs have a noticable time delay to turn on and take about 30 seconds to achieve full brightness
Pricemark (Osram / Sylvania?)They turn on very quickly at full brightness. I've heard that they don't last as long.

Flexnet 530-X Power Meter Information

This is various info I harvested in an attempt to get information about these meters.

Gov. of Can. info (partially quoted below): www.ic.gc.ca/pics/lm/electric/ae/1611r1.pdf The iSA2 meter with Flexnet 530-X is a solid state bidirectional meter approved for metering energy
Energy registered in the forward direction is preceded by the code LST003 prior to displaying the registered value on the display. Similarly energy registered in the reverse direction is preceded by the code LST004.
The iSA2 meter is equipped with a liquid crystal display (LCD). The LCD can be programmed to provide additional information. Information related to the additional display features can be found in the iConA technical manual. [can't find that online]
The iSA2 meter is also known as the iConA.
The raw energy calculation is carried out to a resolution of 1*10-9 Wh and is transmitted by digital serial interface over the Flat Flex cable (FFC) to the register display board, once per line cycle.
A test pulse signal is generated by the metrology chip, which is programmed according to the customer.s preferences, from 1 Wh/pulse to 32 Wh/pulse. This signal is routed to the infrared (IR) test pulse LED on the register display board.
The FlexNet radio can be configured to transmit readings in the following four resolutions: 1 kWh, 0.1 kWh, 0.01 kWh and 0.001 kWh.
The typical resolution used for transmitting on-air meter readings is 1 kWh.
Mfg site: http://www.sensus.com/web/usca/electric/product-line/electricity-metering/product/icon-a-residential-meter

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